A DAY IN THE LIFE: THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG NEGATIVE AFFECT, COVITALITY, AND SPATIAL BEHAVIOR MEASURED BY SELF REPORTED SPATIAL BEHAVIOR, AND BY GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) TECHNOLOGY

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145130
Title:
A DAY IN THE LIFE: THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG NEGATIVE AFFECT, COVITALITY, AND SPATIAL BEHAVIOR MEASURED BY SELF REPORTED SPATIAL BEHAVIOR, AND BY GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) TECHNOLOGY
Author:
Wolf, Pedro Sofio Abril
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The focus of this validation study is to develop and use Global Positioning System (GPS) technology as a tool for psychological research. GPS technology was used to estimate the number of places participants visited over a four day period. To test the convergent validity of this method, this estimate was compared to two self-report methods of measuring the same behavior over the same time frame. All three of these methods were significantly correlated with each other. Results of the split-plot GLM further validated the convergent validity of the GPS method. The test of construct validity was successful when it comes to covitality, however, negative affect did not predict NPV.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
Affect; Depression; Global Positioning System; Individual Differences; Personality
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Figueredo, Aurelio J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA DAY IN THE LIFE: THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG NEGATIVE AFFECT, COVITALITY, AND SPATIAL BEHAVIOR MEASURED BY SELF REPORTED SPATIAL BEHAVIOR, AND BY GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) TECHNOLOGYen_US
dc.creatorWolf, Pedro Sofio Abrilen_US
dc.contributor.authorWolf, Pedro Sofio Abrilen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe focus of this validation study is to develop and use Global Positioning System (GPS) technology as a tool for psychological research. GPS technology was used to estimate the number of places participants visited over a four day period. To test the convergent validity of this method, this estimate was compared to two self-report methods of measuring the same behavior over the same time frame. All three of these methods were significantly correlated with each other. Results of the split-plot GLM further validated the convergent validity of the GPS method. The test of construct validity was successful when it comes to covitality, however, negative affect did not predict NPV.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectAffecten_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectGlobal Positioning Systemen_US
dc.subjectIndividual Differencesen_US
dc.subjectPersonalityen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFigueredo, Aurelio J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMehl, Matthiasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJacobs, Jakeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11525-
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