Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145095
Title:
School-to-Work Reform in Action: Reflections from the Field
Author:
Orton, Madelene Richardson
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The School-to-Work Opportunities Act of 1994 provided seed monies to educational institutions, if they were willing to form collaborative partnerships with members of the business and employer communities. The goal was to build learning opportunities for students that would facilitate their seamless transition from the public school system into adult work-settings and/or places of post-secondary education, training, and skills acquisition. An historical case study of school reform was conducted, using qualitative research methods that included extensive field observations, participant interviews, document analysis, narrative inquiry strategies, phenomenological reflection and data reduction. The lived experiences of 23 students and 14 community partners were juxtaposed against the recollected memories of the teacher-researcher, and analyzed in the context of complex change theory (Ambrose, 1987). The point was to distill the essential themes that could shed light on the research question. Those factors that were deemed to be influential in the development, delivery, or efficacy of the learning opportunities that were created as curriculum interventions, in support of this one piece of federal legislation, are discussed analytically, so as to make recommendations for similar practical programs with a career-education or work-based learning focus.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
Career Education; Educational Policy; Practitioner Research; School-Business Partnerships; School-to-Work Transition Education; Work-based Learning
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Teaching & Teacher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Johnson, Bruce P.; Hutchinson, Charles F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSchool-to-Work Reform in Action: Reflections from the Fielden_US
dc.creatorOrton, Madelene Richardsonen_US
dc.contributor.authorOrton, Madelene Richardsonen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe School-to-Work Opportunities Act of 1994 provided seed monies to educational institutions, if they were willing to form collaborative partnerships with members of the business and employer communities. The goal was to build learning opportunities for students that would facilitate their seamless transition from the public school system into adult work-settings and/or places of post-secondary education, training, and skills acquisition. An historical case study of school reform was conducted, using qualitative research methods that included extensive field observations, participant interviews, document analysis, narrative inquiry strategies, phenomenological reflection and data reduction. The lived experiences of 23 students and 14 community partners were juxtaposed against the recollected memories of the teacher-researcher, and analyzed in the context of complex change theory (Ambrose, 1987). The point was to distill the essential themes that could shed light on the research question. Those factors that were deemed to be influential in the development, delivery, or efficacy of the learning opportunities that were created as curriculum interventions, in support of this one piece of federal legislation, are discussed analytically, so as to make recommendations for similar practical programs with a career-education or work-based learning focus.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectCareer Educationen_US
dc.subjectEducational Policyen_US
dc.subjectPractitioner Researchen_US
dc.subjectSchool-Business Partnershipsen_US
dc.subjectSchool-to-Work Transition Educationen_US
dc.subjectWork-based Learningen_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching & Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Bruce P.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorHutchinson, Charles F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnders, Patricia L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11533-
dc.identifier.oclc752261396-
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