Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/144798
Title:
Comparing the Ignitability of Mulch Materials for a Firewise Landscape
Author:
DeGomez, Tom; Rogstad, Alix; Schalau, Jeff; Kelly, Jack
Affiliation:
Plant Sciences, School of
Publisher:
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
Sep-2007
Description:
5 pp.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/144798
Abstract:
Eight different landscape mulches were tested for their flammability using a propane torch, charcoal briquette, and a cigarette at two different times of the year. Three randomized compete blocks with eight one square meter plots were tested at three locations; Tucson, Prescott, and Flagstaff, Arizona. Each of the mulches was subjected to the heat of a handheld propane torch (15 seconds), a glowing charcoal briquette (five minutes), and a lit cigarette (until burned out). We found that the least dense mulches (pine needles and straw) burned rapidly when subjected to the torch and ignited after the briquette was removed. The medium density mulches (pine bark nuggets and wood chips) had low flame lengths and smoldered. Heavy density mulches (garden compost and shredded bark) only smoldered. The decomposed granite and sod did not ignite or smolder.
Type:
text; Pamphlet
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Mulch; fire; wildfire; bark; compost; wood chips; decomposed granite; ignition; firewise; landscape; flammability; pine needles; straw; sod
Series/Report no.:
University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1440

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDeGomez, Tomen_US
dc.contributor.authorRogstad, Alixen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchalau, Jeffen_US
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Jacken_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-19T09:30:22Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-19T09:30:22Z-
dc.date.issued2007-09en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/144798-
dc.description5 pp.en_US
dc.description.abstractEight different landscape mulches were tested for their flammability using a propane torch, charcoal briquette, and a cigarette at two different times of the year. Three randomized compete blocks with eight one square meter plots were tested at three locations; Tucson, Prescott, and Flagstaff, Arizona. Each of the mulches was subjected to the heat of a handheld propane torch (15 seconds), a glowing charcoal briquette (five minutes), and a lit cigarette (until burned out). We found that the least dense mulches (pine needles and straw) burned rapidly when subjected to the torch and ignited after the briquette was removed. The medium density mulches (pine bark nuggets and wood chips) had low flame lengths and smoldered. Heavy density mulches (garden compost and shredded bark) only smoldered. The decomposed granite and sod did not ignite or smolder.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1440en_US
dc.subjectMulchen_US
dc.subjectfireen_US
dc.subjectwildfireen_US
dc.subjectbarken_US
dc.subjectcomposten_US
dc.subjectwood chipsen_US
dc.subjectdecomposed graniteen_US
dc.subjectignitionen_US
dc.subjectfirewiseen_US
dc.subjectlandscapeen_US
dc.subjectflammabilityen_US
dc.subjectpine needlesen_US
dc.subjectstrawen_US
dc.subjectsoden_US
dc.titleComparing the Ignitability of Mulch Materials for a Firewise Landscapeen_US
dc.typetext-
dc.typePamphlet-
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Sciences, School ofen_US
dc.identifier.calsAZ1440-2007-
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