Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/144789
Title:
Problems and Pests of Agave, Aloe, Cactus and Yucca
Author:
Kelly, Jack; Olsen, Mary W.
Affiliation:
Plant Sciences, School of
Publisher:
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
Mar-2011
Description:
12 pp.; plant disease bulletins; July 2006 original publishing date, rev. 10/08
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/144789
Abstract:
Cacti, agaves and yuccas are classified as succulents, plants that have highly specialized anatomical features such as thick waxy cuticles, fleshy or minimal leaves, modified leaves (spines), and roots with extra storage capabilities for food and water. These modifications allow them to survive and thrive in harsh desert environments. They survive long periods of drought in areas of sparse rainfall and intense heat. During stressful periods, many succulents cease to grow, drop unnecessary leaves, dehydrate and become dormant until conditions for growth return. Despite their adaptations, succulents suffer from diseases, insect pests and cultural problems. Some of the more common problems that occur in cacti, agave and yuccas in Arizona are discussed in this bulletin.
Type:
text; Pamphlet
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
pests; agave; yucca; cactus; insects; diseases; abiotic problems
Series/Report no.:
University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1399

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Jacken_US
dc.contributor.authorOlsen, Mary W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-19T09:30:58Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-19T09:30:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-03en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/144789-
dc.description12 pp.en_US
dc.descriptionplant disease bulletins; July 2006 original publishing date, rev. 10/08en_US
dc.description.abstractCacti, agaves and yuccas are classified as succulents, plants that have highly specialized anatomical features such as thick waxy cuticles, fleshy or minimal leaves, modified leaves (spines), and roots with extra storage capabilities for food and water. These modifications allow them to survive and thrive in harsh desert environments. They survive long periods of drought in areas of sparse rainfall and intense heat. During stressful periods, many succulents cease to grow, drop unnecessary leaves, dehydrate and become dormant until conditions for growth return. Despite their adaptations, succulents suffer from diseases, insect pests and cultural problems. Some of the more common problems that occur in cacti, agave and yuccas in Arizona are discussed in this bulletin.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1399en_US
dc.subjectpestsen_US
dc.subjectagaveen_US
dc.subjectyuccaen_US
dc.subjectcactusen_US
dc.subjectinsectsen_US
dc.subjectdiseasesen_US
dc.subjectabiotic problemsen_US
dc.titleProblems and Pests of Agave, Aloe, Cactus and Yuccaen_US
dc.typetext-
dc.typePamphlet-
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Sciences, School ofen_US
dc.identifier.calsAZ1399-2011-
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