Thermal, chemical, and structural characteristics of fluid migration and fluid-rock interaction in a mid-Proterozoic shear zone, Manzano Mountains, New Mexico.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/144646
Title:
Thermal, chemical, and structural characteristics of fluid migration and fluid-rock interaction in a mid-Proterozoic shear zone, Manzano Mountains, New Mexico.
Author:
Northrup, Clyde John.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The structure in the study area is dominated by a large, mid-Proterozoic shear zone that strikes NE and dips steeply SE. The zone had a NW directed tectonic transport direction during the shearing. Hydrothermal veining developed at several stages in the deformational history. Early fluids were relatively low in salinity and CO$\sb2$ content and flowed through the rock in small, pervasive structural sites produced by ductile deformation. Fluids migrating through the shear zone at progressively later times tended to be more focused along larger more brittle structures, and had higher salinity and CO$\sb2$ contents. The earliest veins show little alteration of the host rocks while progressively later veins show increasing amounts of wall rock alteration. Alteration near early veins is broadly characterized by increased Fe, Mg, Ca, and Al and decreased Si and K; later veins have increased Si and K, manifested by silicification, sericitization, +/$-$ sulfidization of the host rocks.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Geosciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Titley, Spencer R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThermal, chemical, and structural characteristics of fluid migration and fluid-rock interaction in a mid-Proterozoic shear zone, Manzano Mountains, New Mexico.en_US
dc.creatorNorthrup, Clyde John.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNorthrup, Clyde John.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe structure in the study area is dominated by a large, mid-Proterozoic shear zone that strikes NE and dips steeply SE. The zone had a NW directed tectonic transport direction during the shearing. Hydrothermal veining developed at several stages in the deformational history. Early fluids were relatively low in salinity and CO$\sb2$ content and flowed through the rock in small, pervasive structural sites produced by ductile deformation. Fluids migrating through the shear zone at progressively later times tended to be more focused along larger more brittle structures, and had higher salinity and CO$\sb2$ contents. The earliest veins show little alteration of the host rocks while progressively later veins show increasing amounts of wall rock alteration. Alteration near early veins is broadly characterized by increased Fe, Mg, Ca, and Al and decreased Si and K; later veins have increased Si and K, manifested by silicification, sericitization, +/$-$ sulfidization of the host rocks.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairTitley, Spencer R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuiz, Joaquinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConey, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMawer, Chrisen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1343819en_US
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