Drosophila melanogaster: An alternative animal for the study of heavy-metal induced neurotoxicity.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/144637
Title:
Drosophila melanogaster: An alternative animal for the study of heavy-metal induced neurotoxicity.
Author:
Akins, Jonathan McGhee.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Heavy metals cause irreversible neurobehavioral damage in many developing mammals, but the mechanisms of this damage are unknown. The influence of three heavy metal compounds, triethyllead chloride, lead acetate, and cadmium chloride, on lethality, development, behavior and learning was studied using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila was used because it has been extensively characterized genetically at the molecular level, and it allows hundreds of subjects to be used very easily in individual experiments. The larva LC50 $\pm$ standard error for triethyllead chloride, lead acetate, or cadmium chloride was found to be 0.090 $\pm$ 0.004 mM, 6.60 $\pm$ 0.64 mM, or 0.42 $\pm$ 0.04 mM, respectively. Each of the tested compounds produced a dose-related delay in development. In particular, they caused an increase in the time for larvae to develop into pupae. When larvae were reared on medium containing triethyllead chloride (0.06 mM), lead acetate (3.07 mM), or cadmium chloride (0.11 mM), phototaxis, locomotion, and learning in the resulting adults were not inhibited. Since significant neurobehavioral effects were not observed under the experimental conditions used, Drosophila does not appear to be an appropriate animal for the genetic dissection of the neurobehavioral toxic effects of heavy metals.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Pharmacology and Toxicology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Aposhian, H. V.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDrosophila melanogaster: An alternative animal for the study of heavy-metal induced neurotoxicity.en_US
dc.creatorAkins, Jonathan McGhee.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAkins, Jonathan McGhee.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHeavy metals cause irreversible neurobehavioral damage in many developing mammals, but the mechanisms of this damage are unknown. The influence of three heavy metal compounds, triethyllead chloride, lead acetate, and cadmium chloride, on lethality, development, behavior and learning was studied using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila was used because it has been extensively characterized genetically at the molecular level, and it allows hundreds of subjects to be used very easily in individual experiments. The larva LC50 $\pm$ standard error for triethyllead chloride, lead acetate, or cadmium chloride was found to be 0.090 $\pm$ 0.004 mM, 6.60 $\pm$ 0.64 mM, or 0.42 $\pm$ 0.04 mM, respectively. Each of the tested compounds produced a dose-related delay in development. In particular, they caused an increase in the time for larvae to develop into pupae. When larvae were reared on medium containing triethyllead chloride (0.06 mM), lead acetate (3.07 mM), or cadmium chloride (0.11 mM), phototaxis, locomotion, and learning in the resulting adults were not inhibited. Since significant neurobehavioral effects were not observed under the experimental conditions used, Drosophila does not appear to be an appropriate animal for the genetic dissection of the neurobehavioral toxic effects of heavy metals.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmacology and Toxicologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairAposhian, H. V.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1343679en_US
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