Fire effects and vegetation response in a Madrean oak woodland, southeastern Arizona.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/144634
Title:
Fire effects and vegetation response in a Madrean oak woodland, southeastern Arizona.
Author:
Caprio, Anthony Conger.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Following a June wildfire on the south slope of the Santa Catalina Mountains, vegetation was sampled to determine how composition, and fine fuels were affected. Spring and fall samples were taken in burned and unburned plots at three sites on south, east and north aspects. Twenty-one common species were selected for intensive analysis. Burning caused compositional changes with the most significant occurring on the north slope. Woody species and Selaginella were reduced while herbaceous species recovered rapidly. Total cover was generally greater in burned than unburned areas by 2$1\over2$ yr postfire. Recovery was rapid on south slopes dominated by herbaceous perennials and slower on north slopes dominated by woody species and Selaginella preburn. Oaks resprouted well after being topkilled, with Quercus oblongifolia more resistant than Q. emoryi to fire injury. Total herbaceous and litter biomass varied between 272-622 g$\cdot$m$\sp{-2}$ at unburned and 253-370 g$\cdot$m$\sp{-2}$ at burned sites 2$1\over2$ yr postfire.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Zwolinski, Malcolm J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFire effects and vegetation response in a Madrean oak woodland, southeastern Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorCaprio, Anthony Conger.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCaprio, Anthony Conger.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFollowing a June wildfire on the south slope of the Santa Catalina Mountains, vegetation was sampled to determine how composition, and fine fuels were affected. Spring and fall samples were taken in burned and unburned plots at three sites on south, east and north aspects. Twenty-one common species were selected for intensive analysis. Burning caused compositional changes with the most significant occurring on the north slope. Woody species and Selaginella were reduced while herbaceous species recovered rapidly. Total cover was generally greater in burned than unburned areas by 2$1\over2$ yr postfire. Recovery was rapid on south slopes dominated by herbaceous perennials and slower on north slopes dominated by woody species and Selaginella preburn. Oaks resprouted well after being topkilled, with Quercus oblongifolia more resistant than Q. emoryi to fire injury. Total herbaceous and litter biomass varied between 272-622 g$\cdot$m$\sp{-2}$ at unburned and 253-370 g$\cdot$m$\sp{-2}$ at burned sites 2$1\over2$ yr postfire.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairZwolinski, Malcolm J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLehman, Gordon S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin, David Phillipen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1360246en_US
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