Orthostatic blood pressure and heart rate responses within hypovolemic and normovolemic populations.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/144633
Title:
Orthostatic blood pressure and heart rate responses within hypovolemic and normovolemic populations.
Author:
Patterson, Fran Dolores.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A descriptive study was conducted comparing the blood pressure and heart rate responses to position change among hypovolemic and normovolemic subjects. A convenience sample of 32 men and women from an emergency room with complaints of diarrhea, vomiting, vaginal or rectal bleeding for $\ge$12 hours duration were recruited. The normovolemic group consisted of a convenience sample of 30 men and women from the community. Data analysis included a mixed design analysis of variance. Compared to supine baseline measurements, between group changes in the systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure were not statistically significant (p $>$.05). Once the subject stood, heart rate increased statistically significant in both groups (p $<$.05). The data suggest orthostatic hypotension can be considered when the supine resting heart rate is $\ge$87 beats per minute, and if upon standing, heart rate increases by $\ge$19.33 or is $\ge$110 beats per minute. Heart rate measurements should be taken at one minute after standing.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Medicine - Research; Dissertations, Academic; Hypotension, Orthostatic; Blood Pressure; Heart Rate
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Woodtli, M. Anne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOrthostatic blood pressure and heart rate responses within hypovolemic and normovolemic populations.en_US
dc.creatorPatterson, Fran Dolores.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPatterson, Fran Dolores.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA descriptive study was conducted comparing the blood pressure and heart rate responses to position change among hypovolemic and normovolemic subjects. A convenience sample of 32 men and women from an emergency room with complaints of diarrhea, vomiting, vaginal or rectal bleeding for $\ge$12 hours duration were recruited. The normovolemic group consisted of a convenience sample of 30 men and women from the community. Data analysis included a mixed design analysis of variance. Compared to supine baseline measurements, between group changes in the systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure were not statistically significant (p $>$.05). Once the subject stood, heart rate increased statistically significant in both groups (p $<$.05). The data suggest orthostatic hypotension can be considered when the supine resting heart rate is $\ge$87 beats per minute, and if upon standing, heart rate increases by $\ge$19.33 or is $\ge$110 beats per minute. Heart rate measurements should be taken at one minute after standing.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMedicine - Researchen_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectHypotension, Orthostaticen_US
dc.subjectBlood Pressureen_US
dc.subjectHeart Rateen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWoodtli, M. Anneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1357213en_US
dc.identifier.oclc708399222en_US
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