Mexican American Parents' Perceptions of Cultural Influences on Grieving the Death of Their Child

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/144601
Title:
Mexican American Parents' Perceptions of Cultural Influences on Grieving the Death of Their Child
Author:
Russell-Kibble, Audrey
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this Practice Inquiry, Mexican American parents' perceptions of cultural influences on grieving the death of their child were described. Findings were used to inform a continuing education module for nurses involved in the care of Mexican American parents who have experienced the death of their child. This line of inquiry is important as the needs of grieving Mexican American parents are not always recognized by those providing care. Ethnographic methodology was used to explore the narratives of three Mexican American fathers and three Mexican American mothers who had experienced the death of their child. A purposive sample was recruited from a faith based community health center in Tucson, AZ. In depth interviews were conducted primarily in the participants' homes by the researcher. All interviews were conducted in Spanish language. Data sources included participant interviews, participant observation, field notes and measures for demographic data and acculturation (ARSMA-II).The overarching cultural theme that represents the participants' perspectives is El Dolor de los Padres: Pain in the Parent. The three major themes that support the overarching cultural theme include: (a) Enduring Great Pain, (b) Voices of Mexican American Parents, and (c) Cultural Death Traditions. The fourth major theme, Going Forward: For the Provider specifically addresses data gathered to educate nurses for supporting Mexican American parents grieving the death of a child. The findings of the study are interpreted within the context of the Mexican cultural concepts of familismo, machismo, marianismo, fatalismo, spiritualidad, respeto, confianza and personalismo and the concept of vulnerability.The study's significance for the practice of nursing is upheld in the findings that are specific to understanding and preventing disparities in the care of Mexican American parents who have experienced the death of a child. Increasing nursing knowledge of the cultural context of grieving, especially spiritualidad and continuing memories, offering culturally competent nursing interventions at this time of deep emotional pain are elucidated in this Practice Inquiry.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
death of a child; grieving; Mexican American; qualitative research
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Morris McEwen, Marylyn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMexican American Parents' Perceptions of Cultural Influences on Grieving the Death of Their Childen_US
dc.creatorRussell-Kibble, Audreyen_US
dc.contributor.authorRussell-Kibble, Audreyen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this Practice Inquiry, Mexican American parents' perceptions of cultural influences on grieving the death of their child were described. Findings were used to inform a continuing education module for nurses involved in the care of Mexican American parents who have experienced the death of their child. This line of inquiry is important as the needs of grieving Mexican American parents are not always recognized by those providing care. Ethnographic methodology was used to explore the narratives of three Mexican American fathers and three Mexican American mothers who had experienced the death of their child. A purposive sample was recruited from a faith based community health center in Tucson, AZ. In depth interviews were conducted primarily in the participants' homes by the researcher. All interviews were conducted in Spanish language. Data sources included participant interviews, participant observation, field notes and measures for demographic data and acculturation (ARSMA-II).The overarching cultural theme that represents the participants' perspectives is El Dolor de los Padres: Pain in the Parent. The three major themes that support the overarching cultural theme include: (a) Enduring Great Pain, (b) Voices of Mexican American Parents, and (c) Cultural Death Traditions. The fourth major theme, Going Forward: For the Provider specifically addresses data gathered to educate nurses for supporting Mexican American parents grieving the death of a child. The findings of the study are interpreted within the context of the Mexican cultural concepts of familismo, machismo, marianismo, fatalismo, spiritualidad, respeto, confianza and personalismo and the concept of vulnerability.The study's significance for the practice of nursing is upheld in the findings that are specific to understanding and preventing disparities in the care of Mexican American parents who have experienced the death of a child. Increasing nursing knowledge of the cultural context of grieving, especially spiritualidad and continuing memories, offering culturally competent nursing interventions at this time of deep emotional pain are elucidated in this Practice Inquiry.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectdeath of a childen_US
dc.subjectgrievingen_US
dc.subjectMexican Americanen_US
dc.subjectqualitative researchen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMorris McEwen, Marylynen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Pamela Gen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMay, Kathleen Men_US
dc.identifier.proquest11538-
dc.identifier.oclc752261402-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.