Neoliberalism, Creative Destruction and the Economic Reconstruction of Iraq, 2003-2010

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/144372
Title:
Neoliberalism, Creative Destruction and the Economic Reconstruction of Iraq, 2003-2010
Author:
Flannes, Matthew William
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Marshall Plan and post-2003 Iraq represent the two largest US-led, post-war reconstruction projects in history, yet the two cases embody the implementation of two nearly opposite political ideologies. Whereas proponents of the Marshall Plan emphasized the supremacy of the state in reconstruction, Bush administration officials felt that neoliberal market reforms, aided by the opportunistic nature of Schumpetarian creative destruction, were the only legitimate steps required in post-war Iraq. Such discrepancies were largely due to the changing role of the US in the international arena; by the end of the Cold War, Washington was able to take a unilateral approach abroad and more actively push for political and free market reforms. Yet the sectarian chaos that quickly engulfed Iraq and the economic rise of China have all but delegitimized neoliberalism and effectively reopened the issue of the role of the marketplace versus the state in the 21st century.
Type:
Electronic Thesis; text
Keywords:
Reconstruction; Neoliberalism; Marshall Plan; Iraq; Creative Destruction
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Near Eastern Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hudson, Leila O.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNeoliberalism, Creative Destruction and the Economic Reconstruction of Iraq, 2003-2010en_US
dc.creatorFlannes, Matthew Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorFlannes, Matthew Williamen_US
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Marshall Plan and post-2003 Iraq represent the two largest US-led, post-war reconstruction projects in history, yet the two cases embody the implementation of two nearly opposite political ideologies. Whereas proponents of the Marshall Plan emphasized the supremacy of the state in reconstruction, Bush administration officials felt that neoliberal market reforms, aided by the opportunistic nature of Schumpetarian creative destruction, were the only legitimate steps required in post-war Iraq. Such discrepancies were largely due to the changing role of the US in the international arena; by the end of the Cold War, Washington was able to take a unilateral approach abroad and more actively push for political and free market reforms. Yet the sectarian chaos that quickly engulfed Iraq and the economic rise of China have all but delegitimized neoliberalism and effectively reopened the issue of the role of the marketplace versus the state in the 21st century.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.subjectReconstructionen_US
dc.subjectNeoliberalismen_US
dc.subjectMarshall Planen_US
dc.subjectIraqen_US
dc.subjectCreative Destructionen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHudson, Leila O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDunford, David J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNassar, Maha T.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11606en
dc.identifier.oclc752261465en
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