Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/143562
Title:
Idiomatic Root Merge in Modern Hebrew blends
Author:
Pham, Mike
Affiliation:
University of Chicago
Publisher:
University of Arizona Linguistics Circle
Journal:
Coyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics, Linguistic Theory at the University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/143562
Abstract:
In this paper I use the Distributional Morphology framework and semantic Locality Constraints proposed by Arad (2003) to look at category assignments of blends in Modern Hebrew, as well as blends, compounds and idioms in English where relevant. Bat-El (1996) provides an explicit phonological analysis of Modern Hebrew blends, and argues against any morphological process at play in blend formation. I argue, however, that blends and compounds must be accounted for within morphology due to category assignments. I first demonstrate that blends are unquestionably formed by blending fully inflected words rather than roots, and then subsequently reject an analysis that accounts for weakened Locality Constraints by proposing the formation of a new root. Instead, I propose a hypothesis of Idiomatic Root Merge where a root can be an n-place predicate that selects at least an XP sister and a category head. This proposal also entails that there is a structural difference between two surface-similar phrases that have respectively literal and idiomatic meanings.
Type:
text; Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Distributed Morphology; blend; idiom; Modern Hebrew; Locality constraints
ISSN:
0894-4539

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPham, Mikeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-29T14:52:36Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-29T14:52:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.issn0894-4539-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/143562-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper I use the Distributional Morphology framework and semantic Locality Constraints proposed by Arad (2003) to look at category assignments of blends in Modern Hebrew, as well as blends, compounds and idioms in English where relevant. Bat-El (1996) provides an explicit phonological analysis of Modern Hebrew blends, and argues against any morphological process at play in blend formation. I argue, however, that blends and compounds must be accounted for within morphology due to category assignments. I first demonstrate that blends are unquestionably formed by blending fully inflected words rather than roots, and then subsequently reject an analysis that accounts for weakened Locality Constraints by proposing the formation of a new root. Instead, I propose a hypothesis of Idiomatic Root Merge where a root can be an n-place predicate that selects at least an XP sister and a category head. This proposal also entails that there is a structural difference between two surface-similar phrases that have respectively literal and idiomatic meanings.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona Linguistics Circleen_US
dc.subjectDistributed Morphologyen_US
dc.subjectblenden_US
dc.subjectidiomen_US
dc.subjectModern Hebrewen_US
dc.subjectLocality constraintsen_US
dc.titleIdiomatic Root Merge in Modern Hebrew blendsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chicagoen_US
dc.identifier.journalCoyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics, Linguistic Theory at the University of Arizonaen_US
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