Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/143050
Title:
FEAR OF SANCTIONS AND SOCIAL CONTROL.
Author:
CREECHAN, JAMES JOHN HENRY.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation critically analyzes control theories of delinquency, but concentrates on Hirschi's version. The bonds of control reduce to two concepts, "belief" and "attachment," since "involvement" and "commitment" appear to be redundant. An analysis of the dimensionality of both belief and attachment is made in order to provide indicators to test control theory, but no adequate empirical means of reduction is found. A review of deterrence and an analysis of the meaning of sanctions suggest that "fear of sanctions" should also be tested in a control framework, but in order to accomplish this it is necessary to make the distinction between cognitive measures of fear and emotional measures of fear. A measure, "anxiety," based on emotional response is tested and located in a passive aversive conditioning framework. Consideration is also given to the institutional referents of "fear of sanctions" and it appears that legal institutions have the least effective sanctions. The test of control theory uses the general linear model with the three general concepts, in blocks of unspecified causal order, regressed on five specific measures of delinquency and three general indices of delinquency. Some support for control theory is found for belief variables across all acts, but attachment has a lower and less consistent effect. The fear of sanction measures are not relevant to all acts, and where they are, it generally is in a direction opposite to that predicted. An argument is made that control theory most likely reduces to existing theories of socialization, and that there is some support for thinking of it in a passive aversive framework of learning.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Social control; Sanctions (Law)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
Doctoral
Degree Program:
Sociology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFEAR OF SANCTIONS AND SOCIAL CONTROL.en_US
dc.creatorCREECHAN, JAMES JOHN HENRY.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCREECHAN, JAMES JOHN HENRY.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation critically analyzes control theories of delinquency, but concentrates on Hirschi's version. The bonds of control reduce to two concepts, "belief" and "attachment," since "involvement" and "commitment" appear to be redundant. An analysis of the dimensionality of both belief and attachment is made in order to provide indicators to test control theory, but no adequate empirical means of reduction is found. A review of deterrence and an analysis of the meaning of sanctions suggest that "fear of sanctions" should also be tested in a control framework, but in order to accomplish this it is necessary to make the distinction between cognitive measures of fear and emotional measures of fear. A measure, "anxiety," based on emotional response is tested and located in a passive aversive conditioning framework. Consideration is also given to the institutional referents of "fear of sanctions" and it appears that legal institutions have the least effective sanctions. The test of control theory uses the general linear model with the three general concepts, in blocks of unspecified causal order, regressed on five specific measures of delinquency and three general indices of delinquency. Some support for control theory is found for belief variables across all acts, but attachment has a lower and less consistent effect. The fear of sanction measures are not relevant to all acts, and where they are, it generally is in a direction opposite to that predicted. An argument is made that control theory most likely reduces to existing theories of socialization, and that there is some support for thinking of it in a passive aversive framework of learning.en_US
dc.description.noteDigitization Note: P. 98, 148 missing from paper original and microfilm version; pagination error.-
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSocial controlen_US
dc.subjectSanctions (Law)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8306452en_US
dc.identifier.oclc686747978en_US
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