McCarthyism and Libraries: Intellectual Freedom Under Fire, 1947-1954

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/133533
Title:
McCarthyism and Libraries: Intellectual Freedom Under Fire, 1947-1954
Author:
Francoeur, Stephen
Affiliation:
Baruch College
Issue Date:
2006
Description:
Master's thesis in history, Hunter College.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/133533
Additional Links:
http://apps.appl.cuny.edu:83/F/?func=item-global&doc_library=CUN01&doc_number=005089430&year=&volume=&sub_library=HC001
Abstract:
This essay will analyze how library organizations, such as the American Library Association, and individual librarians responded to the pressure placed on libraries during the McCarthy era to deal with alleged subversion. Although libraries have always been the target of censors, it was during the first decade of the Cold War that those Americans most fearful of Communist subversion swept up large numbers of their fellow citizens in a crusade to rid libraries of Communist influence. That effort by the self-proclaimed “loyal Americans” to save libraries put more than just library collections under the microscope. The librarians themselves were scrutinized to ensure that they harbored no troubling past or present connections to radical political groups. Pressure groups examined library services closely as well, keeping an eye out for subversion in library exhibits or making sure that controversial books were only available by request, not on open shelving.
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
library history; anticommunism

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFrancoeur, Stephenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-16T20:56:32Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-16T20:56:32Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/133533-
dc.descriptionMaster's thesis in history, Hunter College.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis essay will analyze how library organizations, such as the American Library Association, and individual librarians responded to the pressure placed on libraries during the McCarthy era to deal with alleged subversion. Although libraries have always been the target of censors, it was during the first decade of the Cold War that those Americans most fearful of Communist subversion swept up large numbers of their fellow citizens in a crusade to rid libraries of Communist influence. That effort by the self-proclaimed “loyal Americans” to save libraries put more than just library collections under the microscope. The librarians themselves were scrutinized to ensure that they harbored no troubling past or present connections to radical political groups. Pressure groups examined library services closely as well, keeping an eye out for subversion in library exhibits or making sure that controversial books were only available by request, not on open shelving.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://apps.appl.cuny.edu:83/F/?func=item-global&doc_library=CUN01&doc_number=005089430&year=&volume=&sub_library=HC001en_US
dc.subjectlibrary historyen_US
dc.subjectanticommunismen_US
dc.titleMcCarthyism and Libraries: Intellectual Freedom Under Fire, 1947-1954en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBaruch Collegeen_US
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