Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/126405
Title:
Tone, intonation, stress and duration in Navajo
Author:
Kidder, Emily
Affiliation:
University of Arizona
Publisher:
University of Arizona Linguistics Circle
Journal:
Coyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics, Linguistic Theory at the University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2008
Description:
Coyote Papers, Vol. 16 features a combined bibliography for all articles in the issue. This bibliography is available at http://arizona.openrepository.com/arizona/handle/10150/125965
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/126405
Abstract:
The phenomena of tone, intonation, stress and duration interact on the phonetic level due to their shared use of the acoustic cues of pitch and segment length. The Navajo language, in which the existence of intonation and stress has been questioned by native speakers and scholars (McDonough, 2002), provides a unique system for studying this interaction, due to the presence of both phonemic tone and phonemic segment length. The variable nature of stress and intonation, as well as their status as linguistic universals has been debated among scholars of prosody (Connell and Ladd, 1990; Laniran, 1992; McDonough, 2002; Hayes, 1995). This paper discusses the interaction between these prosodic elements in Navajo, arguing that stress and intonation cannot be concretely identified, and positing a causal relationship between the presence of contrastive tone and length, the lack of stress and the lack of intonation.
Type:
text; Article
Language:
en_US
ISSN:
0894-4539

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKidder, Emilyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-30T19:24:11Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-30T19:24:11Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.issn0894-4539-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/126405-
dc.descriptionCoyote Papers, Vol. 16 features a combined bibliography for all articles in the issue. This bibliography is available at http://arizona.openrepository.com/arizona/handle/10150/125965en_US
dc.description.abstractThe phenomena of tone, intonation, stress and duration interact on the phonetic level due to their shared use of the acoustic cues of pitch and segment length. The Navajo language, in which the existence of intonation and stress has been questioned by native speakers and scholars (McDonough, 2002), provides a unique system for studying this interaction, due to the presence of both phonemic tone and phonemic segment length. The variable nature of stress and intonation, as well as their status as linguistic universals has been debated among scholars of prosody (Connell and Ladd, 1990; Laniran, 1992; McDonough, 2002; Hayes, 1995). This paper discusses the interaction between these prosodic elements in Navajo, arguing that stress and intonation cannot be concretely identified, and positing a causal relationship between the presence of contrastive tone and length, the lack of stress and the lack of intonation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona Linguistics Circleen_US
dc.titleTone, intonation, stress and duration in Navajoen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalCoyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics, Linguistic Theory at the University of Arizonaen_US
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