Gendered Categories in Presidential Rhetoric: Legitimation and the Gulf War

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/112064
Title:
Gendered Categories in Presidential Rhetoric: Legitimation and the Gulf War
Author:
London, Scott
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist 10:99-118. © 1993 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
1993
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/112064
Abstract:
Presidential rhetoric in the United States provides a window into the ideological legitimation of the state, including its military activities abroad. An analysis of rhetorical strategies in George Bush's public speech at the time of the Persian Gulf War reveals how gendered categories are employed to justify the war to the American public. Drawing on a dualistic conceptualization of "good" (hegemonic) versus "bad" (subordinate) masculinities, the President's war narrative describes a "noble" American military pitted against a "bestial" enemy. This process of legitimation is inseparable from a broader "moral regulation" of American society in which gendered identities are selectively cultivated and marginalized. Presidential rhetoric helps to reify these identities, which become, in turn, indispensable to the war effort.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLondon, Scotten_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-29T20:06:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-29T20:06:31Z-
dc.date.issued1993-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist 10:99-118. © 1993 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/112064-
dc.description.abstractPresidential rhetoric in the United States provides a window into the ideological legitimation of the state, including its military activities abroad. An analysis of rhetorical strategies in George Bush's public speech at the time of the Persian Gulf War reveals how gendered categories are employed to justify the war to the American public. Drawing on a dualistic conceptualization of "good" (hegemonic) versus "bad" (subordinate) masculinities, the President's war narrative describes a "noble" American military pitted against a "bestial" enemy. This process of legitimation is inseparable from a broader "moral regulation" of American society in which gendered identities are selectively cultivated and marginalized. Presidential rhetoric helps to reify these identities, which become, in turn, indispensable to the war effort.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.titleGendered Categories in Presidential Rhetoric: Legitimation and the Gulf Waren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.