Kickin' Some Knowledge: Rap and the Construction of Identity in the African-American Ghetto

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/112061
Title:
Kickin' Some Knowledge: Rap and the Construction of Identity in the African-American Ghetto
Author:
Saunders, Ralph H.
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist 10:23-38. © 1993 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
1993
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/112061
Abstract:
Rap music and videos provide a potentially powerful lens through which to view inner-city neighborhoods and their residents. Rap also provides ghetto residents with a potentially powerful means with which to write their histories and forge their own identities. The dominant discourse on African Americans relegates them to the margins of historical action. Rap is explored as a kind of alternative public sphere, one in which blacks are reflecting on and challenging that discourse. This paper challenges the wholesale categorization of certain populations or groups as "other," and reaffirms the power of individuals and collectivities to make their own histories.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Ralph H.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-29T19:10:49Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-29T19:10:49Z-
dc.date.issued1993-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist 10:23-38. © 1993 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/112061-
dc.description.abstractRap music and videos provide a potentially powerful lens through which to view inner-city neighborhoods and their residents. Rap also provides ghetto residents with a potentially powerful means with which to write their histories and forge their own identities. The dominant discourse on African Americans relegates them to the margins of historical action. Rap is explored as a kind of alternative public sphere, one in which blacks are reflecting on and challenging that discourse. This paper challenges the wholesale categorization of certain populations or groups as "other," and reaffirms the power of individuals and collectivities to make their own histories.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.titleKickin' Some Knowledge: Rap and the Construction of Identity in the African-American Ghettoen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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