Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/112059
Title:
Deodorized Culture: Anthropology of Smell in America
Author:
MacPhee, Marybeth
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist 8:89-102. © 1992 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
1992
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/112059
Abstract:
The sense of smell, though rarely considered important in America, clearly delineates cultural boundaries; this is both demonstrated and promoted through marketing and advertising of consumer products. Historical analyses is invoked to explain why Americans have different tolerances for body odor than their European predecessors. Cultural perceptions of smell are assessed according to Maiy Douglas's models; they are also related to American views of disease and social structure. Odor control manifests as both the American ideal of self-control and as individual expression, or release. The inherent contradictions of these cognitive models are underscored when American culture is examined in terms of its need to control body and environmental odors.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMacPhee, Marybethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-29T17:32:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-29T17:32:16Z-
dc.date.issued1992-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist 8:89-102. © 1992 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/112059-
dc.description.abstractThe sense of smell, though rarely considered important in America, clearly delineates cultural boundaries; this is both demonstrated and promoted through marketing and advertising of consumer products. Historical analyses is invoked to explain why Americans have different tolerances for body odor than their European predecessors. Cultural perceptions of smell are assessed according to Maiy Douglas's models; they are also related to American views of disease and social structure. Odor control manifests as both the American ideal of self-control and as individual expression, or release. The inherent contradictions of these cognitive models are underscored when American culture is examined in terms of its need to control body and environmental odors.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.titleDeodorized Culture: Anthropology of Smell in Americaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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