Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/112058
Title:
A Cognitive Model of Stress
Author:
Van Dyke, Ruth
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist 8:71-88. © 1992 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
1992
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/112058
Abstract:
Freely structured interviews conducted to discern the cognitive model of "stress" shared by a group of American graduate students are described. Interview data concern the perceived causes, effects, coping strategies, and inherency of stress. These data are organized according to categories and discrepancies inherent to the sample. Sets of propositional models are developed that illuminate some aspects of the cognitive model. Processes of externalization characterized the subjects' responses at every level and the concept of the individual in opposition to the social environment has figured prominently in this analysis. Although the model is composed of many parts, it may be reduced to a single principle: stress is a response to the perceived threat embodied in the appropriation by others of control over the self-image of the individual.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVan Dyke, Ruthen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-29T17:29:12Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-29T17:29:12Z-
dc.date.issued1992-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist 8:71-88. © 1992 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/112058-
dc.description.abstractFreely structured interviews conducted to discern the cognitive model of "stress" shared by a group of American graduate students are described. Interview data concern the perceived causes, effects, coping strategies, and inherency of stress. These data are organized according to categories and discrepancies inherent to the sample. Sets of propositional models are developed that illuminate some aspects of the cognitive model. Processes of externalization characterized the subjects' responses at every level and the concept of the individual in opposition to the social environment has figured prominently in this analysis. Although the model is composed of many parts, it may be reduced to a single principle: stress is a response to the perceived threat embodied in the appropriation by others of control over the self-image of the individual.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.titleA Cognitive Model of Stressen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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