Japanese Social Organization in the Tokugawa and Post-World War II Periods: Changes in Family and Household Structure and Organization

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/112037
Title:
Japanese Social Organization in the Tokugawa and Post-World War II Periods: Changes in Family and Household Structure and Organization
Author:
Poncelet, Eric C.
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist 8:36-51. © 1992 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
1992
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/112037
Abstract:
The notion that economic changes embedded in Japan's transition from an agriculturally-based to an industrially-based economy have been associated with corresponding changes in family structure and organization is tested. Changes which did occur were relative and not absolute. Changes in Japanese social organization since 1600 have not been uniform but in fact have been quite varied depending on socio-economic and ecological conditions. Current Japanese trends of decreasing agriculture and increasing industrial urbanization will lead to a continuation in the emergence of the single-person and nuclear family households, equal succession and inheritance, "love" marriages, and neolocal residence as the dominant forms. Nevertheless, the Japanese people are unique in their ongoing attachment to their rich cultural heritage. As long as this loyalty continues, the ie principle will continue to hold an important position in their social lives.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPoncelet, Eric C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-29T17:21:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-29T17:21:15Z-
dc.date.issued1992-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist 8:36-51. © 1992 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/112037-
dc.description.abstractThe notion that economic changes embedded in Japan's transition from an agriculturally-based to an industrially-based economy have been associated with corresponding changes in family structure and organization is tested. Changes which did occur were relative and not absolute. Changes in Japanese social organization since 1600 have not been uniform but in fact have been quite varied depending on socio-economic and ecological conditions. Current Japanese trends of decreasing agriculture and increasing industrial urbanization will lead to a continuation in the emergence of the single-person and nuclear family households, equal succession and inheritance, "love" marriages, and neolocal residence as the dominant forms. Nevertheless, the Japanese people are unique in their ongoing attachment to their rich cultural heritage. As long as this loyalty continues, the ie principle will continue to hold an important position in their social lives.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.titleJapanese Social Organization in the Tokugawa and Post-World War II Periods: Changes in Family and Household Structure and Organizationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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