Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110875
Title:
Traditional Peoples and the Struggle for Land in the Amazon Basin
Author:
Tucker, Catherine M.
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist 12:123-149. © 1996 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110875
Abstract:
Current processes of deforestation and development in the Amazon Basin continue historical trends that have devastated indigenous populations and drastically reduced their land rights. While protection of the Amazon ecosystem has become a worldwide concern, many indigenous and folk groups employ forest management strategies that utilize natural resources without causing permanent degradation. This paper considers historical, political and socioeconomic circumstances that threaten the survival of indigenous groups and their sustainable forms of forest use. The paper argues that discrepant cultural models and attitudes contribute to the differences in land use between traditional Amazon residents and newcomers. The problems and possibilities entailed by efforts to protect traditional land rights are also discussed.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Indigenous and folk populations; land rights; economic development; Amazon; Brazil; political ecology; sustainable resource management
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Catherine M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-08T23:42:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-08T23:42:08Z-
dc.date.issued1996-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist 12:123-149. © 1996 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/110875-
dc.description.abstractCurrent processes of deforestation and development in the Amazon Basin continue historical trends that have devastated indigenous populations and drastically reduced their land rights. While protection of the Amazon ecosystem has become a worldwide concern, many indigenous and folk groups employ forest management strategies that utilize natural resources without causing permanent degradation. This paper considers historical, political and socioeconomic circumstances that threaten the survival of indigenous groups and their sustainable forms of forest use. The paper argues that discrepant cultural models and attitudes contribute to the differences in land use between traditional Amazon residents and newcomers. The problems and possibilities entailed by efforts to protect traditional land rights are also discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous and folk populationsen_US
dc.subjectland rightsen_US
dc.subjecteconomic developmenten_US
dc.subjectAmazonen_US
dc.subjectBrazilen_US
dc.subjectpolitical ecologyen_US
dc.subjectsustainable resource managementen_US
dc.titleTraditional Peoples and the Struggle for Land in the Amazon Basinen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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