"Well I've Reason to Believe, We All Have Been Deceived": Proposition 187, Racist Discourse, and Resistance

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110872
Title:
"Well I've Reason to Believe, We All Have Been Deceived": Proposition 187, Racist Discourse, and Resistance
Author:
García, Rogelio
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist 12:57-83. © 1996 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110872
Abstract:
This paper analyzes racist discourse resulting from and related to California's Proposition 187. Contrary to the views of politicians and economists, I maintain that 187 is indeed a racist measure designed to prevent the entry of people of color, mostly Latinos, into California. Analyses of racist discourse should be contextualized within issues of power, cultural difference, space, culture, and nationalism. After outlining theories of racism, I use Teun van Dijk's work on racist discourse to analyze some of the discursive strategies employed in relation to Proposition 187. The next section discusses the discourse of resistance in Tucson, Arizona and California. Some attention is given to the symbolic violence against Latinos. I argue that discourse cannot be separated from the material world in which it is practiced.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Racism; discourse; ethnicity; resistance; power; difference
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGarcía, Rogelioen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-08T23:09:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-08T23:09:15Z-
dc.date.issued1996-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist 12:57-83. © 1996 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/110872-
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyzes racist discourse resulting from and related to California's Proposition 187. Contrary to the views of politicians and economists, I maintain that 187 is indeed a racist measure designed to prevent the entry of people of color, mostly Latinos, into California. Analyses of racist discourse should be contextualized within issues of power, cultural difference, space, culture, and nationalism. After outlining theories of racism, I use Teun van Dijk's work on racist discourse to analyze some of the discursive strategies employed in relation to Proposition 187. The next section discusses the discourse of resistance in Tucson, Arizona and California. Some attention is given to the symbolic violence against Latinos. I argue that discourse cannot be separated from the material world in which it is practiced.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectRacismen_US
dc.subjectdiscourseen_US
dc.subjectethnicityen_US
dc.subjectresistanceen_US
dc.subjectpoweren_US
dc.subjectdifferenceen_US
dc.title"Well I've Reason to Believe, We All Have Been Deceived": Proposition 187, Racist Discourse, and Resistanceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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