"The Customs of our Ancestors": Cora Religious Conversion and Millenarianism, AD 1722-2000

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110871
Title:
"The Customs of our Ancestors": Cora Religious Conversion and Millenarianism, AD 1722-2000
Author:
Coyle, Philip E.
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist 12:1·30. © 1996 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology. University of Arizona. Tucson. AZ 85721
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110871
Abstract:
Using documentary and ethnographic information, an analogy is drawn between conquest-period (ca. 1722) and contemporary political and religious institutions among the Cora (Nayari) people of the Sierra del Nayar in the Sierra Madre Occidental of Mexico. Fundamental to these political and religious institutions-then and now-is the idea that the deceased elders of the Cora people continue as active agents in the lives of living Coras, particularly as the seasonal rains. Based on this analogy, an inference is extended from contemporary attitudes of Cora people in the town of Santa Teresa toward the political and religious customs that mediate their relationships with these deceased ancestors, to the possible attitudes of Cora people toward their religious customs at the time of the Spanish conquest of the region. Millenarian fear, an anxiety that is widespread in Santa Teresa as contemporary Coras confront their own failure to adequately continue the customs of their ancestors, is inferred to have been a motivating factor in the Cora's acceptance of Catholic religious customs during the colonial period of their history.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Cora; millenarianism; religious conversion; ancestor worship; ethnohistory
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCoyle, Philip E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-08T22:52:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-08T22:52:27Z-
dc.date.issued1996-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist 12:1·30. © 1996 Association of Student Anthropologists Department of Anthropology. University of Arizona. Tucson. AZ 85721en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/110871-
dc.description.abstractUsing documentary and ethnographic information, an analogy is drawn between conquest-period (ca. 1722) and contemporary political and religious institutions among the Cora (Nayari) people of the Sierra del Nayar in the Sierra Madre Occidental of Mexico. Fundamental to these political and religious institutions-then and now-is the idea that the deceased elders of the Cora people continue as active agents in the lives of living Coras, particularly as the seasonal rains. Based on this analogy, an inference is extended from contemporary attitudes of Cora people in the town of Santa Teresa toward the political and religious customs that mediate their relationships with these deceased ancestors, to the possible attitudes of Cora people toward their religious customs at the time of the Spanish conquest of the region. Millenarian fear, an anxiety that is widespread in Santa Teresa as contemporary Coras confront their own failure to adequately continue the customs of their ancestors, is inferred to have been a motivating factor in the Cora's acceptance of Catholic religious customs during the colonial period of their history.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectCoraen_US
dc.subjectmillenarianismen_US
dc.subjectreligious conversionen_US
dc.subjectancestor worshipen_US
dc.subjectethnohistoryen_US
dc.title"The Customs of our Ancestors": Cora Religious Conversion and Millenarianism, AD 1722-2000en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.