Defining Aging and The Aged: Cultural and Social Constructions of Elders in the U.S.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110216
Title:
Defining Aging and The Aged: Cultural and Social Constructions of Elders in the U.S.
Author:
Talarsky, Laura
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist #13: pp. 101-107, ©1998 Association of Student Anthropologists, Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110216
Abstract:
This paper presents a critical analysis of the cultural and social constructions of aging and the aged which pervade public discourse around the growing population of elders in the U.S. Elders are socially 'othered' through processes of medicalization and categorization as an "at risk" group. Furthermore, elders are culturally constructed as unproductive and overconsumptive collective resources. As elders become increasingly central in social and political discourse surrounding health care and the division of resources, these culturally and socially constructed stereotypes have a real impact on social identity and policy decisions. The paper concludes with a discussion of the role of anthropology in contributing a critical perspective to the study of elders.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Elders; cultural and social constructions; medicalization; stigma and identity; public discourse; critical perspectives
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTalarsky, Lauraen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-24T01:27:22Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-24T01:27:22Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist #13: pp. 101-107, ©1998 Association of Student Anthropologists, Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/110216-
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents a critical analysis of the cultural and social constructions of aging and the aged which pervade public discourse around the growing population of elders in the U.S. Elders are socially 'othered' through processes of medicalization and categorization as an "at risk" group. Furthermore, elders are culturally constructed as unproductive and overconsumptive collective resources. As elders become increasingly central in social and political discourse surrounding health care and the division of resources, these culturally and socially constructed stereotypes have a real impact on social identity and policy decisions. The paper concludes with a discussion of the role of anthropology in contributing a critical perspective to the study of elders.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectEldersen_US
dc.subjectcultural and social constructionsen_US
dc.subjectmedicalizationen_US
dc.subjectstigma and identityen_US
dc.subjectpublic discourseen_US
dc.subjectcritical perspectivesen_US
dc.titleDefining Aging and The Aged: Cultural and Social Constructions of Elders in the U.S.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.