Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110214
Title:
The Fit and the Unfit: The Presentation of "Fitness" in Everyday Life
Author:
Miczo, Nathan
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist #13: pp. 57-82, ©1998 Association of Student Anthropologists, Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110214
Abstract:
This paper examines the ways in which individuals attempt to present themselves as healthy and fit human beings, according to the principles of dramaturgic self-presentation. Accordingly, Goffman's notions of face work, teamwork, and stigma are used to develop a framework for understanding how self-presentation impacts human interaction. This framework is then applied to a brief examination of the stigma of AIDS. Next, the framework is applied to the presentation of a healthy and fit self. Three issues are considered: what is common to the definition of fitness, what are some of the dimensions that become salient in light of that common definition, and, what strategies for presentation are possible based on the definition and dimensions. Finally, four variables that might affect which presentation strategy is adopted are considered: attractiveness, gender, age, and class. It is suggested that none of these variables operates in isolation and some of the implications for presentation are considered.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
self-presentation; stigma; fitness communication; moral fitness
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMiczo, Nathanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-24T01:16:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-24T01:16:05Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist #13: pp. 57-82, ©1998 Association of Student Anthropologists, Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/110214-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the ways in which individuals attempt to present themselves as healthy and fit human beings, according to the principles of dramaturgic self-presentation. Accordingly, Goffman's notions of face work, teamwork, and stigma are used to develop a framework for understanding how self-presentation impacts human interaction. This framework is then applied to a brief examination of the stigma of AIDS. Next, the framework is applied to the presentation of a healthy and fit self. Three issues are considered: what is common to the definition of fitness, what are some of the dimensions that become salient in light of that common definition, and, what strategies for presentation are possible based on the definition and dimensions. Finally, four variables that might affect which presentation strategy is adopted are considered: attractiveness, gender, age, and class. It is suggested that none of these variables operates in isolation and some of the implications for presentation are considered.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectself-presentationen_US
dc.subjectstigmaen_US
dc.subjectfitness communicationen_US
dc.subjectmoral fitnessen_US
dc.titleThe Fit and the Unfit: The Presentation of "Fitness" in Everyday Lifeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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