Mortuary Variability and Community Reorganization in the Early-To-Late Natufian Transition

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110213
Title:
Mortuary Variability and Community Reorganization in the Early-To-Late Natufian Transition
Author:
LaMotta, Vincent M.
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist #13: pp. 37-56, ©1998 Association of Student Anthropologists, Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110213
Abstract:
This paper examines community reorganization in the Late Natufian period with reference to a general ecological model that links changes in resource scarcity with social reorganization. This model explains why community reorganization should occur in times of subsistence stress, and provides a basis for generating multiple competing hypotheses to explain the nature of that transformation. One hypothesis, that Natufian communities responded to subsistence stress by centralizing land tenure, intensifying subsistence production, and redistributing subsistence goods, is not supported. An alternative hypothesis, that an unequal distribution of land within Natufian communities allowed some segments of the population to endure subsistence stress while forcing others to migrate to more marginal areas, explains more variability in the archaeological record, and withstands preliminary testing with multiple lines of archaeological evidence.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
mortuary behavior; Natufian culture; community organization
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLaMotta, Vincent M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-24T01:09:21Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-24T01:09:21Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist #13: pp. 37-56, ©1998 Association of Student Anthropologists, Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/110213-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines community reorganization in the Late Natufian period with reference to a general ecological model that links changes in resource scarcity with social reorganization. This model explains why community reorganization should occur in times of subsistence stress, and provides a basis for generating multiple competing hypotheses to explain the nature of that transformation. One hypothesis, that Natufian communities responded to subsistence stress by centralizing land tenure, intensifying subsistence production, and redistributing subsistence goods, is not supported. An alternative hypothesis, that an unequal distribution of land within Natufian communities allowed some segments of the population to endure subsistence stress while forcing others to migrate to more marginal areas, explains more variability in the archaeological record, and withstands preliminary testing with multiple lines of archaeological evidence.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectmortuary behavioren_US
dc.subjectNatufian cultureen_US
dc.subjectcommunity organizationen_US
dc.titleMortuary Variability and Community Reorganization in the Early-To-Late Natufian Transitionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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