Behavioral Variability in Mortuary Deposition: A Modern Material Culture Study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110099
Title:
Behavioral Variability in Mortuary Deposition: A Modern Material Culture Study
Author:
LaMotta, Vincent M.
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist #14: pp.53-80, ©2001 Association of Student Anthropologists, Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
2001
Description:
1999 Dozier Award Winner
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110099
Abstract:
This paper examines critically several key assumptions that have guided many archaeological interpretations of prehistoric mortuary assemblages. It is argued that more sophisticated models of mortuary deposition need to be incorporated into research that attempts to reconstruct community structure and other sociological variables from variation in grave assemblages. To illustrate this point, and to begin to build such models, a study of artifacts deposited in mortuary contexts was conducted by the author in a major urban center in Arizona in 1996. Several different behavioral pathways through which objects enter mortuary contexts are identified in this study, and some general material correlates for each are specified. This study also provides a vehicle for exploring preliminarily how, and to what extent, various forms of mortuary depostion are related to the social identities of the deceased. Finally, a synthetic model is developed which seeks to explain variation in mortuary deposition in terms of behavioral interactions between the living, on the one hand, and the deceased and various classes of material culture, on the other. It is hoped that the general models and material correlates developed through this study can be elaborated by prehistorians to bolster inferences drawn from specific mortuary populations and to explore previously-uncharted realms of mortuary behavior in the past.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Mortuary archaeology; Anthropology of death & burial; Archaeological method & theory; Behavioral archaeology; Modern material culture studies
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLaMotta, Vincent M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-21T03:27:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-21T03:27:59Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist #14: pp.53-80, ©2001 Association of Student Anthropologists, Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/110099-
dc.description1999 Dozier Award Winneren_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines critically several key assumptions that have guided many archaeological interpretations of prehistoric mortuary assemblages. It is argued that more sophisticated models of mortuary deposition need to be incorporated into research that attempts to reconstruct community structure and other sociological variables from variation in grave assemblages. To illustrate this point, and to begin to build such models, a study of artifacts deposited in mortuary contexts was conducted by the author in a major urban center in Arizona in 1996. Several different behavioral pathways through which objects enter mortuary contexts are identified in this study, and some general material correlates for each are specified. This study also provides a vehicle for exploring preliminarily how, and to what extent, various forms of mortuary depostion are related to the social identities of the deceased. Finally, a synthetic model is developed which seeks to explain variation in mortuary deposition in terms of behavioral interactions between the living, on the one hand, and the deceased and various classes of material culture, on the other. It is hoped that the general models and material correlates developed through this study can be elaborated by prehistorians to bolster inferences drawn from specific mortuary populations and to explore previously-uncharted realms of mortuary behavior in the past.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectMortuary archaeologyen_US
dc.subjectAnthropology of death & burialen_US
dc.subjectArchaeological method & theoryen_US
dc.subjectBehavioral archaeologyen_US
dc.subjectModern material culture studiesen_US
dc.titleBehavioral Variability in Mortuary Deposition: A Modern Material Culture Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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