Indian Trappers and the Hudson's Bay Company: Early Means of Negotiation in the Canadian Fur Trade

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110077
Title:
Indian Trappers and the Hudson's Bay Company: Early Means of Negotiation in the Canadian Fur Trade
Author:
Honeyman, Derek
Affiliation:
University of Arizona
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist 15:31-47. © 2003 Arizona Anthropologist
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110077
Abstract:
The fur trade and arrival of the Hudson's Bay Company had numerous effects on northern North American indigenous populations. One such group is the Gwich'in Indians in the northwestern portion of the Northwest Territories. Aside from disease and continued reliance on goods imported from the south, the fur trade disrupted previous economic relationships between indigenous groups. In some examples, the presence of the Hudson's Bay Company furthered tension between indigenous groups as each vied for the control of fur-rich regions and sole access to specific Company posts. However, due to the frontier nature of the Canadian north, the relations between fur trade companies and indigenous peoples was one of mutual accommodation. This was in stark contrast to other European-Indian relations. This paper examines how credit relations between the Hudson's Bay Company and the Gwich'in reveals a model of resistance.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Indian-white relations; credit; fur trade; Gwich'in; sub-Arctic history
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHoneyman, Dereken_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-21T02:35:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-21T02:35:02Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist 15:31-47. © 2003 Arizona Anthropologisten_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/110077-
dc.description.abstractThe fur trade and arrival of the Hudson's Bay Company had numerous effects on northern North American indigenous populations. One such group is the Gwich'in Indians in the northwestern portion of the Northwest Territories. Aside from disease and continued reliance on goods imported from the south, the fur trade disrupted previous economic relationships between indigenous groups. In some examples, the presence of the Hudson's Bay Company furthered tension between indigenous groups as each vied for the control of fur-rich regions and sole access to specific Company posts. However, due to the frontier nature of the Canadian north, the relations between fur trade companies and indigenous peoples was one of mutual accommodation. This was in stark contrast to other European-Indian relations. This paper examines how credit relations between the Hudson's Bay Company and the Gwich'in reveals a model of resistance.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectIndian-white relationsen_US
dc.subjectcrediten_US
dc.subjectfur tradeen_US
dc.subjectGwich'inen_US
dc.subjectsub-Arctic historyen_US
dc.titleIndian Trappers and the Hudson's Bay Company: Early Means of Negotiation in the Canadian Fur Tradeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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