Selective Remembrance: Narratives of Ethnic Reconfiguration and Spatial Displacement in the Life of Queho, 1880s-1940

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110076
Title:
Selective Remembrance: Narratives of Ethnic Reconfiguration and Spatial Displacement in the Life of Queho, 1880s-1940
Author:
Carroll, Alex K.
Affiliation:
University of Arizona
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist 15: 1-30, © 2003 Arizona Anthropologist
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110076
Abstract:
Social memories and collective representations act as vehicles for configuring, legitimizing, and sustaining particular constructs of knowledge and power in the world of lived relations, while simultaneously marginalizing or negating others. This paper explores constancy and change in popular and official histories of a Southern Paiute man who lived in southern Nevada from the 1880s-1940. Accused of killing between seven and thirty people between 1910 and 1940, Queho became the center of multiple historical accounts written over the course of one hundred years. This diachronic analysis highlights the continuous reconfiguration of Queho's ethnicity and place of origin followed by a discussion of the theoretical and practical implications of reconstructing these social memories.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Alex K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-21T02:30:14Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-21T02:30:14Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist 15: 1-30, © 2003 Arizona Anthropologisten_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/110076-
dc.description.abstractSocial memories and collective representations act as vehicles for configuring, legitimizing, and sustaining particular constructs of knowledge and power in the world of lived relations, while simultaneously marginalizing or negating others. This paper explores constancy and change in popular and official histories of a Southern Paiute man who lived in southern Nevada from the 1880s-1940. Accused of killing between seven and thirty people between 1910 and 1940, Queho became the center of multiple historical accounts written over the course of one hundred years. This diachronic analysis highlights the continuous reconfiguration of Queho's ethnicity and place of origin followed by a discussion of the theoretical and practical implications of reconstructing these social memories.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.titleSelective Remembrance: Narratives of Ethnic Reconfiguration and Spatial Displacement in the Life of Queho, 1880s-1940en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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