Negotiating the Moral Politics of Transnational Motherhood: Conducting Ethnographic Research in Central America

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110054
Title:
Negotiating the Moral Politics of Transnational Motherhood: Conducting Ethnographic Research in Central America
Author:
Goldade, Kate R.
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist 17:56-75. © 2006 Arizona Anthropologist
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110054
Abstract:
In this narrative, the author reflects on the personal and ethical dilemmas she faces currently in the beginning stages of conducting dissertation research fieldwork, an aspect often glossed over by retrospective accounts. She is conducting ethnography of Nicaraguan labor migrant women working in Costa Rica's coffee agro-industry, with an emphasis on reproductive health and motherhood. In addition to her social position as a Western, advanced graduate student-researcher, Goldade is also a wife and mother, arriving in the field with her baby daughter just under 4 months of age. She grapples with the challenges of negotiating the moral politics of motherhood and ethnography, seeking collaboration among host country nationals and recruiting study participants, as well as the balancing act of working motherhood.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
transnationalism; ethnographic research; motherhood
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGoldade, Kate R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-20T23:48:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-20T23:48:31Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist 17:56-75. © 2006 Arizona Anthropologisten_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/110054-
dc.description.abstractIn this narrative, the author reflects on the personal and ethical dilemmas she faces currently in the beginning stages of conducting dissertation research fieldwork, an aspect often glossed over by retrospective accounts. She is conducting ethnography of Nicaraguan labor migrant women working in Costa Rica's coffee agro-industry, with an emphasis on reproductive health and motherhood. In addition to her social position as a Western, advanced graduate student-researcher, Goldade is also a wife and mother, arriving in the field with her baby daughter just under 4 months of age. She grapples with the challenges of negotiating the moral politics of motherhood and ethnography, seeking collaboration among host country nationals and recruiting study participants, as well as the balancing act of working motherhood.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.subjecttransnationalismen_US
dc.subjectethnographic researchen_US
dc.subjectmotherhooden_US
dc.titleNegotiating the Moral Politics of Transnational Motherhood: Conducting Ethnographic Research in Central Americaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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