Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110025
Title:
Lessons from New New Journalism
Author:
Burke, Brian; Leckman, Phil; Sturzen, Andrea; Van Vlack, Kathleen; Villanueva, Hecky
Affiliation:
University of Arizona
Citation:
Arizona Anthropologist 17:76-90. © 2006 Arizona Anthropologist
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology
Journal:
Arizona Anthropologist
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/110025
Abstract:
Writing is critical to two main anthropological goals: to communicate useful knowledge about humanity and society; and to stimulate interest, discussion, and action on issues that are of societal import. To achieve these goals anthropologists must write in accessible styles for diverse audiences. In this paper, we review the work of five popular nonfiction writers to determine the extent to which their approachable writing styles are compatible with anthropological rigor and nuance. While none of these authors meets all of our hopes for anthropological analysis, each does manage to blend some elements of scholarship with a readable style. We therefore highlight some of their stylistic approaches in the hope that these might help anthropologists engage more effectively in public debate.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
non-fiction writing; New New Journalism; politics of representation; reflexivity
ISSN:
1062-1601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeckman, Philen_US
dc.contributor.authorSturzen, Andreaen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Vlack, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorVillanueva, Heckyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-20T23:54:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-20T23:54:08Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationArizona Anthropologist 17:76-90. © 2006 Arizona Anthropologisten_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-1601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/110025-
dc.description.abstractWriting is critical to two main anthropological goals: to communicate useful knowledge about humanity and society; and to stimulate interest, discussion, and action on issues that are of societal import. To achieve these goals anthropologists must write in accessible styles for diverse audiences. In this paper, we review the work of five popular nonfiction writers to determine the extent to which their approachable writing styles are compatible with anthropological rigor and nuance. While none of these authors meets all of our hopes for anthropological analysis, each does manage to blend some elements of scholarship with a readable style. We therefore highlight some of their stylistic approaches in the hope that these might help anthropologists engage more effectively in public debate.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Department of Anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectnon-fiction writingen_US
dc.subjectNew New Journalismen_US
dc.subjectpolitics of representationen_US
dc.subjectreflexivityen_US
dc.titleLessons from New New Journalismen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalArizona Anthropologisten_US
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