The Perils of Strong Copyright: The American Library Association and Free Culture

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106502
Title:
The Perils of Strong Copyright: The American Library Association and Free Culture
Author:
Griffey, Jason M.
Citation:
The Perils of Strong Copyright: The American Library Association and Free Culture 2004-04,
Issue Date:
Apr-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106502
Submitted date:
2005-06-06
Abstract:
The current state of intellectual property law is labyrinthine in every sense: it is difficult to follow, full of blind alleys, and the only people who know the way through it are the ones who designed it in the first place. Pamela Samuelson notes in Towards a New Politics of Intellectual Property, “copyright industry groups have cultivated relationships with policy makers in the executive and legislative branches over a long period of time” (98) and these relationships have been used to maintain control over copyrighted materials far beyond the length of time of commercial success of said materials. James Boyle noted that “the ground rules of the information society are being laid down by lawyers (strike one) employed by the biggest players in the field (strike two) all with little public debate or press scrutiny.” (Boyle, “Sold Out”) My goal in this paper will be to examine the history of copyright, attempt to unite some of the disparate aspects of the open information meme, and finally to consider how this meme is being distributed (or not distributed) by academic librarians. I will also attempt to make prescriptive suggestions that might assist librarians in seeing the strengths of the Open Information memepool.
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Keywords:
Scholarly Communication
Local subject classification:
intellectual property; digital culture; ALA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGriffey, Jason M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-06-06T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:48:34Z-
dc.date.issued2004-04en_US
dc.date.submitted2005-06-06en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Perils of Strong Copyright: The American Library Association and Free Culture 2004-04,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/106502-
dc.description.abstractThe current state of intellectual property law is labyrinthine in every sense: it is difficult to follow, full of blind alleys, and the only people who know the way through it are the ones who designed it in the first place. Pamela Samuelson notes in Towards a New Politics of Intellectual Property, “copyright industry groups have cultivated relationships with policy makers in the executive and legislative branches over a long period of time” (98) and these relationships have been used to maintain control over copyrighted materials far beyond the length of time of commercial success of said materials. James Boyle noted that “the ground rules of the information society are being laid down by lawyers (strike one) employed by the biggest players in the field (strike two) all with little public debate or press scrutiny.” (Boyle, “Sold Out”) My goal in this paper will be to examine the history of copyright, attempt to unite some of the disparate aspects of the open information meme, and finally to consider how this meme is being distributed (or not distributed) by academic librarians. I will also attempt to make prescriptive suggestions that might assist librarians in seeing the strengths of the Open Information memepool.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectScholarly Communicationen_US
dc.subject.otherintellectual propertyen_US
dc.subject.otherdigital cultureen_US
dc.subject.otherALAen_US
dc.titleThe Perils of Strong Copyright: The American Library Association and Free Cultureen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
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