Knowledge mobilization: The challenge for information professionals

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106400
Title:
Knowledge mobilization: The challenge for information professionals
Author:
Keen, Peter G.W.
Editors:
Khoo, C.; Singh, D.; Chaudhry, A.S.
Citation:
Knowledge mobilization: The challenge for information professionals 2006, :1-9
Publisher:
School of Communication & Information, Nanyang Technological University
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106400
Submitted date:
2007-05-23
Abstract:
This paper examines the challenges that the success of library and information systems design and implementation is now generating. It makes a distinction between management and mobilization and argues that the organizational success of the interrelated fields of knowledge management and in-formation systems (KM/IS) rests on strengthening (1) their descriptive understanding of how individuals in organizations make their own choices about accessing, using and sharing knowledge and (2) corre-sponding prescriptive recommendations for adapting the technical designs of KM/IS to best accommo-date those choices. It is success that has created this need, in that every major trend in KM/IS adds to user choices and reduces institutional control; the library now has no locked doors and experts can â meetâ wherever they are and whenever they want. Blogs bypass all the formal traditions, practices, edi-torial policies, verification procedures and protections against libel and misrepresentation of traditional print media. The frequent use of the term â democratic journalismâ to describe the blog phenomenon (George, 2006) in itself implies that traditional journalism is non-democratic. While KM/IS is not driven by a search for profits in the mass consumer market, it shares the same basic aim as leaders in consumer electronics, mobile data services, and even the gaming field. It is a commitment of institutional funds, whether from research grants or in-house sources, to innovate through information technology. The pur-pose of the innovation is to enable and encourage new behaviors. Knowledge management is focused in this regard on knowledge-sharing and collaboration. Information services are generally more centered on individual information-seeking and learning. When user choices determine the adoption and impact of this type pf innovation, then obviously it is essential to understand the foundations and dynamics of choice.
Type:
Conference Paper
Language:
en
Keywords:
Knowledge Management
Local subject classification:
Knowledge mobilization

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKeen, Peter G.W.en_US
dc.contributor.editorKhoo, C.en_US
dc.contributor.editorSingh, D.en_US
dc.contributor.editorChaudhry, A.S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-05-23T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:45:48Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.submitted2007-05-23en_US
dc.identifier.citationKnowledge mobilization: The challenge for information professionals 2006, :1-9en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/106400-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the challenges that the success of library and information systems design and implementation is now generating. It makes a distinction between management and mobilization and argues that the organizational success of the interrelated fields of knowledge management and in-formation systems (KM/IS) rests on strengthening (1) their descriptive understanding of how individuals in organizations make their own choices about accessing, using and sharing knowledge and (2) corre-sponding prescriptive recommendations for adapting the technical designs of KM/IS to best accommo-date those choices. It is success that has created this need, in that every major trend in KM/IS adds to user choices and reduces institutional control; the library now has no locked doors and experts can â meetâ wherever they are and whenever they want. Blogs bypass all the formal traditions, practices, edi-torial policies, verification procedures and protections against libel and misrepresentation of traditional print media. The frequent use of the term â democratic journalismâ to describe the blog phenomenon (George, 2006) in itself implies that traditional journalism is non-democratic. While KM/IS is not driven by a search for profits in the mass consumer market, it shares the same basic aim as leaders in consumer electronics, mobile data services, and even the gaming field. It is a commitment of institutional funds, whether from research grants or in-house sources, to innovate through information technology. The pur-pose of the innovation is to enable and encourage new behaviors. Knowledge management is focused in this regard on knowledge-sharing and collaboration. Information services are generally more centered on individual information-seeking and learning. When user choices determine the adoption and impact of this type pf innovation, then obviously it is essential to understand the foundations and dynamics of choice.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSchool of Communication & Information, Nanyang Technological Universityen_US
dc.subjectKnowledge Managementen_US
dc.subject.otherKnowledge mobilizationen_US
dc.titleKnowledge mobilization: The challenge for information professionalsen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
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