Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106359
Title:
New technology and the reading process
Author:
Dillon, Andrew
Citation:
New technology and the reading process 1991-06, 11(6):23-26 Computers in Libraries
Publisher:
Medford, NJ: Information Today
Journal:
Computers in Libraries
Issue Date:
Jun-1991
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106359
Submitted date:
2006-08-04
Abstract:
This item is not the definitive copy. Please use the following citation when referencing this material: Dillon, A. (1991) New technology and the reading process. Computers in Libraries, 11(6) 23-26. Abstract: The present paper discusses some the important issues involved in presenting text on screen. It is argued that reading is a complex cognitive and physical skill that requires careful analysis if technology is going to support rather than hinder the user. The need to consider texts individually in terms of how and why they are read as well as the type of information they contain is discussed. On the basis of a study of journal usage the implications of this approach for the presentation of electronic journals is described.
Type:
Journal Article (Paginated)
Language:
en
Keywords:
Digital Libraries; Human Computer Interaction

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDillon, Andrewen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-08-04T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:45:08Z-
dc.date.issued1991-06en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-08-04en_US
dc.identifier.citationNew technology and the reading process 1991-06, 11(6):23-26 Computers in Librariesen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/106359-
dc.description.abstractThis item is not the definitive copy. Please use the following citation when referencing this material: Dillon, A. (1991) New technology and the reading process. Computers in Libraries, 11(6) 23-26. Abstract: The present paper discusses some the important issues involved in presenting text on screen. It is argued that reading is a complex cognitive and physical skill that requires careful analysis if technology is going to support rather than hinder the user. The need to consider texts individually in terms of how and why they are read as well as the type of information they contain is discussed. On the basis of a study of journal usage the implications of this approach for the presentation of electronic journals is described.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMedford, NJ: Information Todayen_US
dc.subjectDigital Librariesen_US
dc.subjectHuman Computer Interactionen_US
dc.titleNew technology and the reading processen_US
dc.typeJournal Article (Paginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalComputers in Librariesen_US
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