The Index Catalogue and Historical Shifts in Medical Knowledge, & Word Usage Patterns

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106349
Title:
The Index Catalogue and Historical Shifts in Medical Knowledge, & Word Usage Patterns
Author:
Lussky, Joan
Editors:
Breitenstein, Mikel
Citation:
The Index Catalogue and Historical Shifts in Medical Knowledge, & Word Usage Patterns 2004,
Publisher:
dLIST
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106349
Submitted date:
2007-02-15
Abstract:
Faithful aggregated accounts of the advancement of science are invaluable for those setting scientific policy as well as scholars of the history of science. As science develops the scholarly communityiÌ s determination of the accepted knowledge undergoes shifts. Within medicine these shifts include our understanding of what can cause disease and what defines specific disease entities. Shifts in accepted medical knowledge are captured in the medical literature. The Index Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon GeneraliÌ s Office, United States Army, published from 1880 -1961, is an extremely large index to medical literature. The newly digitized form of this index, referred to as the IndexCat, allows us a way to generate faithful accounts of the development of medical science during the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-centuries. My data looks at shifts within the IndexCat surrounding three disease entities: syphilis, Huntington's chorea, and beriberi, and their interactions with two disease causation theories: germ and hereditary, from 1880-1930. Temporal changes in the prominent subject heading words and title words within the literature of these diseases and disease theories corroborate qualitative accounts of this same literature, which reports the complex and sometimes oblique process of knowledge accretion. Although preliminary, my results indicate that the IndexCat is a valuable tool for studying the development of medical knowledge.
Type:
Conference Paper
Language:
en
Keywords:
Classification; Indexing; Cataloging; Medical Libraries; History

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLussky, Joanen_US
dc.contributor.editorBreitenstein, Mikelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-02-15T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:45:00Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.submitted2007-02-15en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Index Catalogue and Historical Shifts in Medical Knowledge, & Word Usage Patterns 2004,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/106349-
dc.description.abstractFaithful aggregated accounts of the advancement of science are invaluable for those setting scientific policy as well as scholars of the history of science. As science develops the scholarly communityiÌ s determination of the accepted knowledge undergoes shifts. Within medicine these shifts include our understanding of what can cause disease and what defines specific disease entities. Shifts in accepted medical knowledge are captured in the medical literature. The Index Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon GeneraliÌ s Office, United States Army, published from 1880 -1961, is an extremely large index to medical literature. The newly digitized form of this index, referred to as the IndexCat, allows us a way to generate faithful accounts of the development of medical science during the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-centuries. My data looks at shifts within the IndexCat surrounding three disease entities: syphilis, Huntington's chorea, and beriberi, and their interactions with two disease causation theories: germ and hereditary, from 1880-1930. Temporal changes in the prominent subject heading words and title words within the literature of these diseases and disease theories corroborate qualitative accounts of this same literature, which reports the complex and sometimes oblique process of knowledge accretion. Although preliminary, my results indicate that the IndexCat is a valuable tool for studying the development of medical knowledge.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherdLISTen_US
dc.subjectClassificationen_US
dc.subjectIndexingen_US
dc.subjectCatalogingen_US
dc.subjectMedical Librariesen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.titleThe Index Catalogue and Historical Shifts in Medical Knowledge, & Word Usage Patternsen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
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