GIF versus JPEG: Choosing a Graphics Compression Format for Web Publications

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106314
Title:
GIF versus JPEG: Choosing a Graphics Compression Format for Web Publications
Author:
Nicholson, Scott
Citation:
GIF versus JPEG: Choosing a Graphics Compression Format for Web Publications 1998, 17(2):109-110 Information Technology and Libraries
Journal:
Information Technology and Libraries
Issue Date:
1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106314
Submitted date:
2005-02-14
Abstract:
Currently, there are two formats for graphics that are used in Web publications: GIF (officially pronounced "jif") and JPEG (also known as JPG, and pronounced "jay-peg"). Each of these standards takes a computer image and compresses it up to 100 times. Today's browsers have built-in decompressors for each format, so many Web page creators do not know which one to use. The common myth is that JPEG creates smaller files, but this is not always true. The intention of this article is to help Web page creators make an informed decision when selecting a format for each graphic in a Web publication.
Type:
Journal Article (Paginated)
Language:
en
Keywords:
World Wide Web
Local subject classification:
image quality; special features; file size

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNicholson, Scotten_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-02-14T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:44:22Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.date.submitted2005-02-14en_US
dc.identifier.citationGIF versus JPEG: Choosing a Graphics Compression Format for Web Publications 1998, 17(2):109-110 Information Technology and Librariesen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/106314-
dc.description.abstractCurrently, there are two formats for graphics that are used in Web publications: GIF (officially pronounced "jif") and JPEG (also known as JPG, and pronounced "jay-peg"). Each of these standards takes a computer image and compresses it up to 100 times. Today's browsers have built-in decompressors for each format, so many Web page creators do not know which one to use. The common myth is that JPEG creates smaller files, but this is not always true. The intention of this article is to help Web page creators make an informed decision when selecting a format for each graphic in a Web publication.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectWorld Wide Weben_US
dc.subject.otherimage qualityen_US
dc.subject.otherspecial featuresen_US
dc.subject.otherfile sizeen_US
dc.titleGIF versus JPEG: Choosing a Graphics Compression Format for Web Publicationsen_US
dc.typeJournal Article (Paginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalInformation Technology and Librariesen_US
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