Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106310
Title:
HCI Hypermedia
Author:
Dillon, Andrew
Editors:
Karwowski, Waldemar
Citation:
HCI Hypermedia 2001, :(10) Encyclopedia of Human Factors and Ergonomics
Publisher:
London: Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Encyclopedia of Human Factors and Ergonomics
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106310
Submitted date:
2006-07-31
Abstract:
This item is not the definitive copy. Please use the following citation when referencing this material: Dillon, A. (2001) Usability Issues in Hypermedia. In: W. Karwowski (ed). Encyclopedia of Human Factors and Ergonomics. London: Taylor and Francis. 1. Introduction: Hypermedia is a general term used to describe the presentation of graphical, textual, audio and video information in nodes (chunks) that can be linked together and accessed in a manner determined by the immediate interests of the user. Originating as an idea for mechanized information access and organization that better reflected the natural workings of the human mind by Vannevar Bush (1945), the potential of the computer to provide the best means of supporting hypermedia was recognized early on by thinkers such as Ted Nelson and Doug Engelbart (for a historical overview see Conklin, 1987). The move toward hypermedia-based digital documents holds with it the promise of user-controlled, immediate access to the world of published information and stored data. While originally a specialist application domain, in the last few years the World Wide Web has brought to everyoneĆ¢ s desktop the power and problems of hypermedia interaction. Yet from the outset, human factors researchers have noted a range of user issues that prevent the simple transition from analog to digital resources
Type:
Book Chapter
Language:
en
Keywords:
Digital Libraries; Cognitive Science; Hypertext and Hypermedia; Information Systems

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDillon, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.editorKarwowski, Waldemaren_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-31T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:44:19Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-07-31en_US
dc.identifier.citationHCI Hypermedia 2001, :(10) Encyclopedia of Human Factors and Ergonomicsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/106310-
dc.description.abstractThis item is not the definitive copy. Please use the following citation when referencing this material: Dillon, A. (2001) Usability Issues in Hypermedia. In: W. Karwowski (ed). Encyclopedia of Human Factors and Ergonomics. London: Taylor and Francis. 1. Introduction: Hypermedia is a general term used to describe the presentation of graphical, textual, audio and video information in nodes (chunks) that can be linked together and accessed in a manner determined by the immediate interests of the user. Originating as an idea for mechanized information access and organization that better reflected the natural workings of the human mind by Vannevar Bush (1945), the potential of the computer to provide the best means of supporting hypermedia was recognized early on by thinkers such as Ted Nelson and Doug Engelbart (for a historical overview see Conklin, 1987). The move toward hypermedia-based digital documents holds with it the promise of user-controlled, immediate access to the world of published information and stored data. While originally a specialist application domain, in the last few years the World Wide Web has brought to everyoneĆ¢ s desktop the power and problems of hypermedia interaction. Yet from the outset, human factors researchers have noted a range of user issues that prevent the simple transition from analog to digital resourcesen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherLondon: Taylor and Francisen_US
dc.subjectDigital Librariesen_US
dc.subjectCognitive Scienceen_US
dc.subjectHypertext and Hypermediaen_US
dc.subjectInformation Systemsen_US
dc.titleHCI Hypermediaen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.journalEncyclopedia of Human Factors and Ergonomicsen_US
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