The Influence of User Perceptions on Software Utilization: Application and Evaluation of a Theoretical Model of Technology Acceptance

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106206
Title:
The Influence of User Perceptions on Software Utilization: Application and Evaluation of a Theoretical Model of Technology Acceptance
Author:
Morris, Michael G.; Dillon, Andrew
Citation:
The Influence of User Perceptions on Software Utilization: Application and Evaluation of a Theoretical Model of Technology Acceptance 1997, 14(4):58-65 IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering
Publisher:
IEEE, Inc.
Journal:
IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering
Issue Date:
1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106206
Submitted date:
2006-07-12
Abstract:
This paper presents and empirically evaluates a Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) which can serve as a simple to use, and cost-effective tool for evaluating applications and reliably predicting whether they will be accepted by users. After presenting TAM, the paper reports on a study designed to evaluate its effectiveness at predicting system use. In the study the researchers presented 76 novice users with an overview and hands-on demonstration of Netscape. Following this demonstration, data on user perceptions and attitudes about Netscape were gathered based on this initial exposure to the system. Follow up data was then gathered two weeks later to evaluate actual use of Netscape following the demonstration. Results suggest that TAM is an effective and cost effective tool for predicting end user acceptance of systems. Suggestions for future research and conclusions for both researchers and practitioners are offered.
Type:
Journal Article (Paginated)
Language:
en
Keywords:
World Wide Web; User Studies; Information Systems
Local subject classification:
Usability; Technology acceptance; User perceptions; Technology Acceptance Model

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Michael G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDillon, Andrewen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-12T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:42:32Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-07-12en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Influence of User Perceptions on Software Utilization: Application and Evaluation of a Theoretical Model of Technology Acceptance 1997, 14(4):58-65 IEEE Transactions on Software Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/106206-
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents and empirically evaluates a Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) which can serve as a simple to use, and cost-effective tool for evaluating applications and reliably predicting whether they will be accepted by users. After presenting TAM, the paper reports on a study designed to evaluate its effectiveness at predicting system use. In the study the researchers presented 76 novice users with an overview and hands-on demonstration of Netscape. Following this demonstration, data on user perceptions and attitudes about Netscape were gathered based on this initial exposure to the system. Follow up data was then gathered two weeks later to evaluate actual use of Netscape following the demonstration. Results suggest that TAM is an effective and cost effective tool for predicting end user acceptance of systems. Suggestions for future research and conclusions for both researchers and practitioners are offered.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIEEE, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectWorld Wide Weben_US
dc.subjectUser Studiesen_US
dc.subjectInformation Systemsen_US
dc.subject.otherUsabilityen_US
dc.subject.otherTechnology acceptanceen_US
dc.subject.otherUser perceptionsen_US
dc.subject.otherTechnology Acceptance Modelen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of User Perceptions on Software Utilization: Application and Evaluation of a Theoretical Model of Technology Acceptanceen_US
dc.typeJournal Article (Paginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalIEEE Transactions on Software Engineeringen_US
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