Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106186
Title:
Enabling the information commons
Author:
Bradley, Fiona
Citation:
Enabling the information commons 2004,
Publisher:
Australian Library and Information Association
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106186
Submitted date:
2006-03-12
Abstract:
As more libraries embrace the term 'information commons' to name services and symbolise their mission, this paper explores the meaning of the concept in Australia and the US. The public library as we know it was founded on principles of providing free access to all. This is now threatened by the growth of information as commodity, and has led many to question the controls and costs of information in society. This paper examines threats that emerge from commercialisation, legislation, funding, and the changing role of libraries. The responses to these threats by libraries, individuals and organisations are detailed. Projects and alternative models that aim to protect the information commons are discussed. This paper asks if libraries should be political about this issue, and what the consequences of such action may be on funding, intellectual freedom, trust and communities. What steps can librarians take to ensure access to information for all individuals in the future? Do the information commons represent a new direction for librarianship, or a renewed emphasis on traditional values?
Type:
Conference Paper
Language:
en
Keywords:
Scholarly Communication; Libraries
Local subject classification:
information commons; open access; copyright; Creative Commons

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Fionaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-03-12T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:42:12Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-03-12en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnabling the information commons 2004,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/106186-
dc.description.abstractAs more libraries embrace the term 'information commons' to name services and symbolise their mission, this paper explores the meaning of the concept in Australia and the US. The public library as we know it was founded on principles of providing free access to all. This is now threatened by the growth of information as commodity, and has led many to question the controls and costs of information in society. This paper examines threats that emerge from commercialisation, legislation, funding, and the changing role of libraries. The responses to these threats by libraries, individuals and organisations are detailed. Projects and alternative models that aim to protect the information commons are discussed. This paper asks if libraries should be political about this issue, and what the consequences of such action may be on funding, intellectual freedom, trust and communities. What steps can librarians take to ensure access to information for all individuals in the future? Do the information commons represent a new direction for librarianship, or a renewed emphasis on traditional values?en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAustralian Library and Information Associationen_US
dc.subjectScholarly Communicationen_US
dc.subjectLibrariesen_US
dc.subject.otherinformation commonsen_US
dc.subject.otheropen accessen_US
dc.subject.othercopyrighten_US
dc.subject.otherCreative Commonsen_US
dc.titleEnabling the information commonsen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
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