Assessing the Value of a Journal Beyond the Impact Factor: Journal of Education for Library and Information Science

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106166
Title:
Assessing the Value of a Journal Beyond the Impact Factor: Journal of Education for Library and Information Science
Author:
Coleman, Anita Sundaram
Citation:
Assessing the Value of a Journal Beyond the Impact Factor: Journal of Education for Library and Information Science 2006-01,
Issue Date:
Jan-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106166
Submitted date:
2006-01-20
Abstract:
This is a preprint of a paper published in the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology volume 58, issue 8, pages 1148-161, June 2007. The well-documented limitations of journal impact factor rankings and perceptual ratings, the evolving scholarly communication system, the open access movement, and increasing globalization are some reasons that prompted an examination of journal value rather than just impact. Using a single specialized journal established in 1960, about education for the Information professions, this paper discusses the fall from citation grace of the Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS) in terms of impact factor and declining subscriptions. Journal evaluation studies in Library and Information Science based on subjective ratings are used to show the high rank of JELIS during the same period (1984-2004) and explain why impact factors and perceptual ratings either singly or jointly are inadequate measures for understanding the value of specialized, scholarly journals such as JELIS. This case study was also a search for bibliometric measures of journal value. Three measures, namely journal attraction power, author associativity, and journal consumption power, were selected; two of them were re-defined as journal measures of affinity (the proportion of foreign authors), associativity (the amount of collaboration), and calculated as objective indicators of journal value. Affinity and associativity for JELIS calculated for 1984, 1994, 2004 and consumption calculated for 1985 and 1994 show a holding pattern but also reveal interesting dimensions for future study. A multi-dimensional concept of value should be further investigated wherein costs, benefits, and measures for informative and scientific value are clearly distinguished for the development of a fuller model of journal value.
Type:
Preprint
Language:
en
Keywords:
Scholarly Communication

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorColeman, Anita Sundaramen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-01-20T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:41:54Z-
dc.date.issued2006-01en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-01-20en_US
dc.identifier.citationAssessing the Value of a Journal Beyond the Impact Factor: Journal of Education for Library and Information Science 2006-01,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/106166-
dc.description.abstractThis is a preprint of a paper published in the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology volume 58, issue 8, pages 1148-161, June 2007. The well-documented limitations of journal impact factor rankings and perceptual ratings, the evolving scholarly communication system, the open access movement, and increasing globalization are some reasons that prompted an examination of journal value rather than just impact. Using a single specialized journal established in 1960, about education for the Information professions, this paper discusses the fall from citation grace of the Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS) in terms of impact factor and declining subscriptions. Journal evaluation studies in Library and Information Science based on subjective ratings are used to show the high rank of JELIS during the same period (1984-2004) and explain why impact factors and perceptual ratings either singly or jointly are inadequate measures for understanding the value of specialized, scholarly journals such as JELIS. This case study was also a search for bibliometric measures of journal value. Three measures, namely journal attraction power, author associativity, and journal consumption power, were selected; two of them were re-defined as journal measures of affinity (the proportion of foreign authors), associativity (the amount of collaboration), and calculated as objective indicators of journal value. Affinity and associativity for JELIS calculated for 1984, 1994, 2004 and consumption calculated for 1985 and 1994 show a holding pattern but also reveal interesting dimensions for future study. A multi-dimensional concept of value should be further investigated wherein costs, benefits, and measures for informative and scientific value are clearly distinguished for the development of a fuller model of journal value.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectScholarly Communicationen_US
dc.titleAssessing the Value of a Journal Beyond the Impact Factor: Journal of Education for Library and Information Scienceen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
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