Usability evaluation of the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust Library web site

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106144
Title:
Usability evaluation of the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust Library web site
Author:
Ebenezer, Catherine
Citation:
Usability evaluation of the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust Library web site 2001-09,
Issue Date:
Sep-2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106144
Submitted date:
2004-09-20
Abstract:
A usability evaluation was carried out of the recently-launched South London and Maudsley NHS Trust library web site using a variety of standard methodologies: content and design evaluation of selected comparable sites, focus groups, a questionnaire survey of library and web development staff, heuristic evaluation, observation testing, card sorting/cluster analysis, and label intuitiveness/category membership testing. All test participants were staff of or providers of services to the trust. Demographic information was recorded for each participant. Unsuccessful attempts were made to evaluate user feedback, and to compare usability test results with usage statistics. Test participantsâ overall responses to the site were enthusiastic and favourable, indicating the scope and content of the site to be broadly appropriate to the user group. Numerous suggestions for new content areas were made by testers. Usability problems were discovered in two main areas: in the organisation of the site, and in the terminology used to refer to information services and sources. On the basis of test results, proposals for a revised menu structure, improved accessibility, and changes to the terminology used within the site are presented.
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Keywords:
Libraries; Web Metrics; Information Seeking Behaviors
Local subject classification:
Library web sites; Web site usability; Clinician information seeking; Health libraries

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEbenezer, Catherineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-09-20T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:41:35Z-
dc.date.issued2001-09en_US
dc.date.submitted2004-09-20en_US
dc.identifier.citationUsability evaluation of the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust Library web site 2001-09,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/106144-
dc.description.abstractA usability evaluation was carried out of the recently-launched South London and Maudsley NHS Trust library web site using a variety of standard methodologies: content and design evaluation of selected comparable sites, focus groups, a questionnaire survey of library and web development staff, heuristic evaluation, observation testing, card sorting/cluster analysis, and label intuitiveness/category membership testing. All test participants were staff of or providers of services to the trust. Demographic information was recorded for each participant. Unsuccessful attempts were made to evaluate user feedback, and to compare usability test results with usage statistics. Test participantsâ overall responses to the site were enthusiastic and favourable, indicating the scope and content of the site to be broadly appropriate to the user group. Numerous suggestions for new content areas were made by testers. Usability problems were discovered in two main areas: in the organisation of the site, and in the terminology used to refer to information services and sources. On the basis of test results, proposals for a revised menu structure, improved accessibility, and changes to the terminology used within the site are presented.en_US
dc.format.mimetypedocen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectLibrariesen_US
dc.subjectWeb Metricsen_US
dc.subjectInformation Seeking Behaviorsen_US
dc.subject.otherLibrary web sitesen_US
dc.subject.otherWeb site usabilityen_US
dc.subject.otherClinician information seekingen_US
dc.subject.otherHealth librariesen_US
dc.titleUsability evaluation of the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust Library web siteen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
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