Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106071
Title:
Copyright Transfer Agreements in an Interdisciplinary Repository
Author:
Coleman, Anita Sundaram; Malone, Cheryl Knott; Xia, Jingfeng; Nelson, Shawn T.
Citation:
Copyright Transfer Agreements in an Interdisciplinary Repository 2005,
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/106071
Submitted date:
2005-08-17
Abstract:
Copyright Transfer Agreements (CTA) are a rich source of rights information related to self-archiving. According to the Eprints Self-Archiving FAQ, "To self-archive is to deposit a digital document in a publicly accessible website, preferably an OAI-compliant Eprint Archive." (1) This poster describes a study undertaken by DLIST whereby the CTAs of selected LIS journals were analyzed for publisher statements on the rights of authors related to self-archiving. The study differs from efforts such as the SHERPA/RoMEO database (2) that resulted from the large open access studies of Project RoMEO (3). The main differences are: 1) our focus on LIS journals and 2) focus on journals rather than publishers, since publishers appear to have different policies and CTAs for each of their journals. RoMEO/SHERPA focus on publishers in all disciplines and as such LIS is not fully/adequately represented. DLIST, Digital Library of Information Science and Technology is an Open Access Archive (OAA) for Library and Information Science and Technology based on E-prints; a cross-institutional disciplinary repository for the Information Sciences that focus on cultural heritage institutions such as Archives, Libraries, and Museums using interdisciplinary perspectives. To some researchers cultural heritage institutions and formal educational organizations are the critical information infrastructures for building the knowledge society.
Type:
Conference Poster
Language:
en
Keywords:
Scholarly Communication

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorColeman, Anita Sundaramen_US
dc.contributor.authorMalone, Cheryl Knotten_US
dc.contributor.authorXia, Jingfengen_US
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Shawn T.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-17T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:39:16Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.submitted2005-08-17en_US
dc.identifier.citationCopyright Transfer Agreements in an Interdisciplinary Repository 2005,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/106071-
dc.description.abstractCopyright Transfer Agreements (CTA) are a rich source of rights information related to self-archiving. According to the Eprints Self-Archiving FAQ, "To self-archive is to deposit a digital document in a publicly accessible website, preferably an OAI-compliant Eprint Archive." (1) This poster describes a study undertaken by DLIST whereby the CTAs of selected LIS journals were analyzed for publisher statements on the rights of authors related to self-archiving. The study differs from efforts such as the SHERPA/RoMEO database (2) that resulted from the large open access studies of Project RoMEO (3). The main differences are: 1) our focus on LIS journals and 2) focus on journals rather than publishers, since publishers appear to have different policies and CTAs for each of their journals. RoMEO/SHERPA focus on publishers in all disciplines and as such LIS is not fully/adequately represented. DLIST, Digital Library of Information Science and Technology is an Open Access Archive (OAA) for Library and Information Science and Technology based on E-prints; a cross-institutional disciplinary repository for the Information Sciences that focus on cultural heritage institutions such as Archives, Libraries, and Museums using interdisciplinary perspectives. To some researchers cultural heritage institutions and formal educational organizations are the critical information infrastructures for building the knowledge society.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectScholarly Communicationen_US
dc.titleCopyright Transfer Agreements in an Interdisciplinary Repositoryen_US
dc.typeConference Posteren_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.