Why structure and genre matter to users of digital information: a longitudinal study with readers of a web-based newspaper

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105924
Title:
Why structure and genre matter to users of digital information: a longitudinal study with readers of a web-based newspaper
Author:
Vaughan, Misha; Dillon, Andrew
Citation:
Why structure and genre matter to users of digital information: a longitudinal study with readers of a web-based newspaper 2006, 64:502-526 International Journal of Human-Computer Studies
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
International Journal of Human-Computer Studies
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105924
Submitted date:
2006-07-07
Abstract:
In an effort to understand the impact of designing for digital genres on usersâ mental representations of structure, a two-phase study was conducted. In phase 1, six expert news readers and a panel of HCI experts were solicited for input regarding genre-conforming and genre-violating web news page design, navigation, and story categorization. In phase 2, a longitudinal experiment with a group of 25 novice web news readers who were exposed to one of the two designs over 5 sessions is reported. During these sessions a variety of user data were captured, including: comprehension (recall, recognition), usability (time on task, accuracy, user satisfaction), and navigation (path length, category node hits). The between-group difference of web site design was signiï¬ cant for comprehension, usability, and navigation with the users of the genre-conforming design demonstrating better performance. The within-group difference of time was signiï¬ cant across these three measures as well, with performance improving over time. No interaction effect was found between web site design and time on comprehension or usability. However, a surprising interaction effect was found on navigation; speciï¬ cally the breadth of navigation (i.e. the number of nodes visited for two classes of tasks) increased over time more dramatically for the genre-violating group than for the genre-conforming group. By examining the changes in these data over time and between the two designs, evidence for the development of usersâ mental representations of structure was captured.
Type:
Journal Article (Paginated)
Language:
en
Keywords:
World Wide Web; Digital Libraries; Human Computer Interaction; Hypertext and Hypermedia; User Studies; Information Architecture

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVaughan, Mishaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDillon, Andrewen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-07T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:36:47Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-07-07en_US
dc.identifier.citationWhy structure and genre matter to users of digital information: a longitudinal study with readers of a web-based newspaper 2006, 64:502-526 International Journal of Human-Computer Studiesen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105924-
dc.description.abstractIn an effort to understand the impact of designing for digital genres on usersâ mental representations of structure, a two-phase study was conducted. In phase 1, six expert news readers and a panel of HCI experts were solicited for input regarding genre-conforming and genre-violating web news page design, navigation, and story categorization. In phase 2, a longitudinal experiment with a group of 25 novice web news readers who were exposed to one of the two designs over 5 sessions is reported. During these sessions a variety of user data were captured, including: comprehension (recall, recognition), usability (time on task, accuracy, user satisfaction), and navigation (path length, category node hits). The between-group difference of web site design was signiï¬ cant for comprehension, usability, and navigation with the users of the genre-conforming design demonstrating better performance. The within-group difference of time was signiï¬ cant across these three measures as well, with performance improving over time. No interaction effect was found between web site design and time on comprehension or usability. However, a surprising interaction effect was found on navigation; speciï¬ cally the breadth of navigation (i.e. the number of nodes visited for two classes of tasks) increased over time more dramatically for the genre-violating group than for the genre-conforming group. By examining the changes in these data over time and between the two designs, evidence for the development of usersâ mental representations of structure was captured.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.subjectWorld Wide Weben_US
dc.subjectDigital Librariesen_US
dc.subjectHuman Computer Interactionen_US
dc.subjectHypertext and Hypermediaen_US
dc.subjectUser Studiesen_US
dc.subjectInformation Architectureen_US
dc.titleWhy structure and genre matter to users of digital information: a longitudinal study with readers of a web-based newspaperen_US
dc.typeJournal Article (Paginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Human-Computer Studiesen_US
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