Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105920
Title:
Bibliometric indicators and the social sciences
Author:
Katz, J. Sylvan
Citation:
Bibliometric indicators and the social sciences 1999-12,
Issue Date:
Dec-1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105920
Submitted date:
2002-07-29
Abstract:
Social science research is published in a wider variety of publication types and addresses more national issues than natural science research. This makes the construction of internationally comparable bibliometric indicators somewhat problematic. However, in internationally oriented fields, like economics and psychology, bibliometric indicators can provide a reasonable measure of the publishing size and impact of these research communities. The UK share of the world publications in the social sciences and behavioural sciences increased between 1981 and 1998 according to data derived from the National Science Indicators on diskette (NSIOD) produced by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). The UK has its largest percentage share of world papers in environmental studies and geography & development. Its strongest growth in percentage share of world papers was in the management sciences. The UK share of psychology publications grew from 7% to 10% and economics publications grew from 10% to 13% over the 18-year time interval. England displayed its greatest growth in the percentage share of UK publications in rehabilitation, Scotland in communications, Wales in library & information sciences and North Ireland in psychology. It is shown in this report that the conventional impact indicator (citations/paper) gives a distorted view of the UK's impact because impact increases non-linearly with publishing size. A new indicator, the relative international citation impact (RICI) indicator that has been corrected to account for the non-linear relationship between impact and publishing size, is introduced. Using a sequence of fourteen 5-year overlapping time periods, the RICI indicator portrays a different picture of the impact of UK psychology and economics research than the conventional impact indicator. It shows that UK impact exceeded the US impact in psychology across all 13 time intervals and it matched or exceeded the US impact in economics in 8 out of the 13 intervals
Type:
Report
Language:
en
Keywords:
Bibliometrics

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKatz, J. Sylvanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2002-07-29T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:36:43Z-
dc.date.issued1999-12en_US
dc.date.submitted2002-07-29en_US
dc.identifier.citationBibliometric indicators and the social sciences 1999-12,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105920-
dc.description.abstractSocial science research is published in a wider variety of publication types and addresses more national issues than natural science research. This makes the construction of internationally comparable bibliometric indicators somewhat problematic. However, in internationally oriented fields, like economics and psychology, bibliometric indicators can provide a reasonable measure of the publishing size and impact of these research communities. The UK share of the world publications in the social sciences and behavioural sciences increased between 1981 and 1998 according to data derived from the National Science Indicators on diskette (NSIOD) produced by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). The UK has its largest percentage share of world papers in environmental studies and geography & development. Its strongest growth in percentage share of world papers was in the management sciences. The UK share of psychology publications grew from 7% to 10% and economics publications grew from 10% to 13% over the 18-year time interval. England displayed its greatest growth in the percentage share of UK publications in rehabilitation, Scotland in communications, Wales in library & information sciences and North Ireland in psychology. It is shown in this report that the conventional impact indicator (citations/paper) gives a distorted view of the UK's impact because impact increases non-linearly with publishing size. A new indicator, the relative international citation impact (RICI) indicator that has been corrected to account for the non-linear relationship between impact and publishing size, is introduced. Using a sequence of fourteen 5-year overlapping time periods, the RICI indicator portrays a different picture of the impact of UK psychology and economics research than the conventional impact indicator. It shows that UK impact exceeded the US impact in psychology across all 13 time intervals and it matched or exceeded the US impact in economics in 8 out of the 13 intervalsen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectBibliometricsen_US
dc.titleBibliometric indicators and the social sciencesen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.