Information Literacy Skills of Occupational Therapy Graduates: A Survey of Learning Outcomes

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105881
Title:
Information Literacy Skills of Occupational Therapy Graduates: A Survey of Learning Outcomes
Author:
Powell, Carol A.; Case-Smith, Jane
Citation:
Information Literacy Skills of Occupational Therapy Graduates: A Survey of Learning Outcomes 2003-10, 91(4):468-477 Journal of the Medical Library Association
Publisher:
Medical Library Association
Journal:
Journal of the Medical Library Association
Issue Date:
Oct-2003
Description:
"Copyright in all articles appearing in the Journal of the Medical Library Association is owned by their authors. Readers may copy articles without permission of the copyright owners, as long as the author and the Medical Library Association are acknowledged in the copy and the copy is used for educational, not-for-profit purposes."
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105881
Submitted date:
2004-04-18
Abstract:
Objectives: The purpose of this study is to assess whether recent graduates of the Ohio State University's Occupational Therapy division are applying information-seeking skills they learned as undergraduates, and to seek their advice on ways to improve information-literacy instruction for current and future occupational therapy students. Method: A survey was sent to a sample of graduates from 1995â 2000. The results were entered into an SPSS database, and descriptive and inferential results were calculated to determine the information-seeking patterns of these recent graduates. Results: A majority of the occupational therapy graduates who responded to the survey prefer to use information resources that are readily available to them, such as advice from their colleagues or supervisors (79%) and the Internet (69%), rather than the evidence available in the journal literature. Twenty-six percent (26%) of the graduates have searched MEDLINE or CINAHL at least once since they graduated. Formal library instruction sessions were considered useful by 42% of the graduates, and 22% of the graduates found informal contacts with librarians to be useful. Conclusions: Librarians and occupational therapy faculty must intensify their efforts to convey the importance of applying research information to patient care and inform students of ways to access this information after they graduate. In addition to teaching searching skills for MEDLINE and CINAHL, they must provide instruction on how to assess the quality of information they find on the Internet. Other findings suggest that occupational therapy practitioners need access to information systems in the clinical setting that synthesize the research in a way that is readily applicable to patient-care issues.
Type:
Journal Article (Paginated)
Language:
en
Keywords:
null; Information Literacy; Information Seeking Behaviors
Local subject classification:
Undergraduate; Internet; MEDLINE; CINAHL

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Carol A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCase-Smith, Janeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-04-18T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:36:08Z-
dc.date.issued2003-10en_US
dc.date.submitted2004-04-18en_US
dc.identifier.citationInformation Literacy Skills of Occupational Therapy Graduates: A Survey of Learning Outcomes 2003-10, 91(4):468-477 Journal of the Medical Library Associationen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105881-
dc.description"Copyright in all articles appearing in the Journal of the Medical Library Association is owned by their authors. Readers may copy articles without permission of the copyright owners, as long as the author and the Medical Library Association are acknowledged in the copy and the copy is used for educational, not-for-profit purposes."en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The purpose of this study is to assess whether recent graduates of the Ohio State University's Occupational Therapy division are applying information-seeking skills they learned as undergraduates, and to seek their advice on ways to improve information-literacy instruction for current and future occupational therapy students. Method: A survey was sent to a sample of graduates from 1995â 2000. The results were entered into an SPSS database, and descriptive and inferential results were calculated to determine the information-seeking patterns of these recent graduates. Results: A majority of the occupational therapy graduates who responded to the survey prefer to use information resources that are readily available to them, such as advice from their colleagues or supervisors (79%) and the Internet (69%), rather than the evidence available in the journal literature. Twenty-six percent (26%) of the graduates have searched MEDLINE or CINAHL at least once since they graduated. Formal library instruction sessions were considered useful by 42% of the graduates, and 22% of the graduates found informal contacts with librarians to be useful. Conclusions: Librarians and occupational therapy faculty must intensify their efforts to convey the importance of applying research information to patient care and inform students of ways to access this information after they graduate. In addition to teaching searching skills for MEDLINE and CINAHL, they must provide instruction on how to assess the quality of information they find on the Internet. Other findings suggest that occupational therapy practitioners need access to information systems in the clinical setting that synthesize the research in a way that is readily applicable to patient-care issues.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMedical Library Associationen_US
dc.subjectnullen_US
dc.subjectInformation Literacyen_US
dc.subjectInformation Seeking Behaviorsen_US
dc.subject.otherUndergraduateen_US
dc.subject.otherInterneten_US
dc.subject.otherMEDLINEen_US
dc.subject.otherCINAHLen_US
dc.titleInformation Literacy Skills of Occupational Therapy Graduates: A Survey of Learning Outcomesen_US
dc.typeJournal Article (Paginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Medical Library Associationen_US
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