The Emergence of China as a Leading Nation in Science. Research Policy, 35(1), 2006, 83-104.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105840
Title:
The Emergence of China as a Leading Nation in Science. Research Policy, 35(1), 2006, 83-104.
Author:
Zhou, Ping; Leydesdorff, Loet
Citation:
The Emergence of China as a Leading Nation in Science. Research Policy, 35(1), 2006, 83-104. 2006,
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105840
Submitted date:
2006-09-23
Abstract:
China has become the fifth leading nation in terms of its share of the worldâ s scientific publications. The citation rate of papers with a Chinese address for the corresponding author also exhibits exponential growth. More specifically, China has become a major player in critical technologies like nanotechnology. Although it is difficult to delineate nanoscience and nanotechnology, we show that China has recently achieved a position second only to that of the USA. Funding for R&D has been growing exponentially, but since 1997 even more in terms of business expenditure than in terms of government expenditure. It seems that the Chinese government has effectively used the public-sector research potential to boost the knowledge-based economy of the country. Thus, China may be achieving the (â Lisbonâ ) objectives of the transition to a knowledge-based economy more broadly and rapidly than its western counterparts. Because of the sustained increase in Chinese government funding and the virtually unlimited reservoir of highly-skilled human resources, one may expect a continuation of this growth pattern in the near future.
Type:
Preprint
Language:
en
Keywords:
Science Technology Studies
Local subject classification:
R&D; GERD; Publications; Citations; World share; Highly-cited papers; Nanotechnology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Pingen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeydesdorff, Loeten_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-23T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:35:21Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-09-23en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Emergence of China as a Leading Nation in Science. Research Policy, 35(1), 2006, 83-104. 2006,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105840-
dc.description.abstractChina has become the fifth leading nation in terms of its share of the worldâ s scientific publications. The citation rate of papers with a Chinese address for the corresponding author also exhibits exponential growth. More specifically, China has become a major player in critical technologies like nanotechnology. Although it is difficult to delineate nanoscience and nanotechnology, we show that China has recently achieved a position second only to that of the USA. Funding for R&D has been growing exponentially, but since 1997 even more in terms of business expenditure than in terms of government expenditure. It seems that the Chinese government has effectively used the public-sector research potential to boost the knowledge-based economy of the country. Thus, China may be achieving the (â Lisbonâ ) objectives of the transition to a knowledge-based economy more broadly and rapidly than its western counterparts. Because of the sustained increase in Chinese government funding and the virtually unlimited reservoir of highly-skilled human resources, one may expect a continuation of this growth pattern in the near future.en_US
dc.format.mimetypehtmen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectScience Technology Studiesen_US
dc.subject.otherR&Den_US
dc.subject.otherGERDen_US
dc.subject.otherPublicationsen_US
dc.subject.otherCitationsen_US
dc.subject.otherWorld shareen_US
dc.subject.otherHighly-cited papersen_US
dc.subject.otherNanotechnologyen_US
dc.titleThe Emergence of China as a Leading Nation in Science. Research Policy, 35(1), 2006, 83-104.en_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
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