Nine Principles of Knowledge Organization. Preprint of paper published in: Advances in Knowledge Organization, 1994, Vol. 4, pp 91-100. (Proceedings of the Third International ISKO Conference 20-24 June 1994 Copenhagen, Denmark).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105798
Title:
Nine Principles of Knowledge Organization. Preprint of paper published in: Advances in Knowledge Organization, 1994, Vol. 4, pp 91-100. (Proceedings of the Third International ISKO Conference 20-24 June 1994 Copenhagen, Denmark).
Author:
Hjørland, Birger
Citation:
Nine Principles of Knowledge Organization. Preprint of paper published in: Advances in Knowledge Organization, 1994, Vol. 4, pp 91-100. (Proceedings of the Third International ISKO Conference 20-24 June 1994 Copenhagen, Denmark). 1994,
Issue Date:
1994
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105798
Submitted date:
2008-01-02
Abstract:
The core problem in Information Science (IS) is in my opinion information seeking and "information retrieval", (IR), which is aimed at helping users become informed by helping them identify documents, which are the "best textual means to some end" (Wilson, 1968). Other problems, such as the design of information systems and knowledge organization (e.g. by classification and indexing) should be seen as means to that end. However, IS has ignored some fundamental problems, which questions the possibility of having a profession and a discipline trying to solve the above mentioned problems. Much research in IS has been based on certain problematic views of knowledge, and searched for principles of knowledge organization, which are independent of claims of subject-knowledge. In this paper, we shall look at the problems of knowledge organization based on a view of knowledge as a historical developed product in which principles of organization is tied to domain-specific criteria. The article is organized as an argumentation for nine principles on the organization of knowledge: Principle # 1: Naive-realistic perception of knowledge structures is not possible in more advanced sciences. The deepest principles on the organization on knowledge rest upon principles developed in and by scientific disciplines. Principle # 2: Categorizations and classifications should unite related subjects and separate unrelated subjects. In naive realism, subject relationships are based on similarity. Two things or subjects are seen as related if they are "alike", that is if they have common properties (descriptive terms) ascribed. Principle # 3 For practical purposes, knowledge can be organized in different ways, and with different levels of ambition: Principle # 4: Any given categorization should reflect the purpose of that categorization. It is very important to teach the student to find out the lie of the land and apply ad hoc classifications, pragmatic classifications or scientific classifications when each kind of classification is most appropriate. Principle # 5: Concrete scientific categorizations and classifications can always be questioned. Principle # 6: The concept of "polyrepresentation" (cf. Ingwersen, 1994) is important. Principle # 7: To a certain degree different arts and sciences could be understood as different ways of organizing the same phenomena. Principle # 8: The nature of disciplines varies. Principle # 9: The quality of the knowledge production in many disciplines is in great trouble
Type:
Preprint
Language:
en
Keywords:
Knowledge Organization

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHjørland, Birgeren_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-01-02T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:34:37Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.date.submitted2008-01-02en_US
dc.identifier.citationNine Principles of Knowledge Organization. Preprint of paper published in: Advances in Knowledge Organization, 1994, Vol. 4, pp 91-100. (Proceedings of the Third International ISKO Conference 20-24 June 1994 Copenhagen, Denmark). 1994,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105798-
dc.description.abstractThe core problem in Information Science (IS) is in my opinion information seeking and "information retrieval", (IR), which is aimed at helping users become informed by helping them identify documents, which are the "best textual means to some end" (Wilson, 1968). Other problems, such as the design of information systems and knowledge organization (e.g. by classification and indexing) should be seen as means to that end. However, IS has ignored some fundamental problems, which questions the possibility of having a profession and a discipline trying to solve the above mentioned problems. Much research in IS has been based on certain problematic views of knowledge, and searched for principles of knowledge organization, which are independent of claims of subject-knowledge. In this paper, we shall look at the problems of knowledge organization based on a view of knowledge as a historical developed product in which principles of organization is tied to domain-specific criteria. The article is organized as an argumentation for nine principles on the organization of knowledge: Principle # 1: Naive-realistic perception of knowledge structures is not possible in more advanced sciences. The deepest principles on the organization on knowledge rest upon principles developed in and by scientific disciplines. Principle # 2: Categorizations and classifications should unite related subjects and separate unrelated subjects. In naive realism, subject relationships are based on similarity. Two things or subjects are seen as related if they are "alike", that is if they have common properties (descriptive terms) ascribed. Principle # 3 For practical purposes, knowledge can be organized in different ways, and with different levels of ambition: Principle # 4: Any given categorization should reflect the purpose of that categorization. It is very important to teach the student to find out the lie of the land and apply ad hoc classifications, pragmatic classifications or scientific classifications when each kind of classification is most appropriate. Principle # 5: Concrete scientific categorizations and classifications can always be questioned. Principle # 6: The concept of "polyrepresentation" (cf. Ingwersen, 1994) is important. Principle # 7: To a certain degree different arts and sciences could be understood as different ways of organizing the same phenomena. Principle # 8: The nature of disciplines varies. Principle # 9: The quality of the knowledge production in many disciplines is in great troubleen_US
dc.format.mimetypedocen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectKnowledge Organizationen_US
dc.titleNine Principles of Knowledge Organization. Preprint of paper published in: Advances in Knowledge Organization, 1994, Vol. 4, pp 91-100. (Proceedings of the Third International ISKO Conference 20-24 June 1994 Copenhagen, Denmark).en_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
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