Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105717
Title:
Canadian Copyright Law: Perceptions of Creators and Users
Author:
Kipp, Margaret E. I.
Citation:
Canadian Copyright Law: Perceptions of Creators and Users 2005-05,
Issue Date:
May-2005
Description:
Connections 2005, Montreal, QC, May 14-15
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105717
Submitted date:
2007-09-24
Abstract:
Information is increasingly seen as the commodity which drives both national and international trade. The legal concept of copyright can function to regulate and balance the dissemination of information to ensure that creators are fairly compensated for access to their creations. Advances in information technology have resulted in increasing interest in the harmonisation of copyright law as copying of material and transportation across borders becomes much easier and much harder to control. While owners and creators wage a desperate battle to remain in complete control of the distribution of their creations, libraries and educational institutions imagine the possible benefits of 24/7 access to information for their patrons. The important question is how to ensure the continuance of the balance between the rights of the creators of information, in order to ensure their continued production of works, and the rights of the users of information. Canada has recently amended its copyright act (http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/c-42/38965.html) to further the process of coming into compliance with international treaties. In preparation for these changes, the government of Canada solicited comments on proposed changes to copyright law. These comments are available on the web and consist of the unedited submissions from 700 Canadians or interested groups, both corporate and non-profit. (http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/epic/internet/incrp-prda.nsf/en/h_rp01105e.html) These responses will be analysed using content analysis and informetric methods. The emphasis will be on examining how people are viewing their relationship to copyrighted works and the Copyright Act. The attitudes discovered in these responses will be compared to the published Library and Information Science literature. This material is ripe for analysis and will provide valuable insights into Canadian perspectives on copyright.
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en
Keywords:
Economics of Information
Local subject classification:
copyright; intellectual property; Canada

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKipp, Margaret E. I.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-09-24T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:33:03Z-
dc.date.issued2005-05en_US
dc.date.submitted2007-09-24en_US
dc.identifier.citationCanadian Copyright Law: Perceptions of Creators and Users 2005-05,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105717-
dc.descriptionConnections 2005, Montreal, QC, May 14-15en_US
dc.description.abstractInformation is increasingly seen as the commodity which drives both national and international trade. The legal concept of copyright can function to regulate and balance the dissemination of information to ensure that creators are fairly compensated for access to their creations. Advances in information technology have resulted in increasing interest in the harmonisation of copyright law as copying of material and transportation across borders becomes much easier and much harder to control. While owners and creators wage a desperate battle to remain in complete control of the distribution of their creations, libraries and educational institutions imagine the possible benefits of 24/7 access to information for their patrons. The important question is how to ensure the continuance of the balance between the rights of the creators of information, in order to ensure their continued production of works, and the rights of the users of information. Canada has recently amended its copyright act (http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/c-42/38965.html) to further the process of coming into compliance with international treaties. In preparation for these changes, the government of Canada solicited comments on proposed changes to copyright law. These comments are available on the web and consist of the unedited submissions from 700 Canadians or interested groups, both corporate and non-profit. (http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/epic/internet/incrp-prda.nsf/en/h_rp01105e.html) These responses will be analysed using content analysis and informetric methods. The emphasis will be on examining how people are viewing their relationship to copyrighted works and the Copyright Act. The attitudes discovered in these responses will be compared to the published Library and Information Science literature. This material is ripe for analysis and will provide valuable insights into Canadian perspectives on copyright.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEconomics of Informationen_US
dc.subject.othercopyrighten_US
dc.subject.otherintellectual propertyen_US
dc.subject.otherCanadaen_US
dc.titleCanadian Copyright Law: Perceptions of Creators and Usersen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
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