How collaborative is collaborative writing? An Analysis of the production of two technical reports

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105700
Title:
How collaborative is collaborative writing? An Analysis of the production of two technical reports
Author:
Dillon, Andrew
Editors:
Sharples, Mike
Citation:
How collaborative is collaborative writing? An Analysis of the production of two technical reports 1993, :69-86 Computer Supported Collaborative Writing
Publisher:
London: Springer-Verlag
Journal:
Computer Supported Collaborative Writing
Issue Date:
1993
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105700
Submitted date:
2006-06-14
Abstract:
Published in: M.Sharples (Ed) Computer Supported Collaborative Writing. (London: Springer-Verlag) 1993. pp 69-86. INTRODUCTION: Psychologists have been taking an increasing interest in the writing process over the last decade and models of human cognition and task behaviour during writing are emerging (see e.g., Hayes and Flower 1980, Sharples et al 1989). Though we are far short of a complete model of this process several basic components have been identified and most theorists allude to these at some stage in their description. For example, it is reckoned (as much from common sense as experimental analysis) that most writing proceeds through a basic sequence of actions from a rough plan through a draft to a revision stage which may occur cyclically until the writer believes the document is ready. Plans can be considered as either detailed or vague, influenced by expectations of the readerâ s knowledge, the typical form of the document being produced and so forth. The drafts may vary from the extremely sketchy to the almost complete depending on the writerâ s experience, knowledge of the subject, preferred writing style etc. and revisions include such acts as minor spell checking, proofreading or complete re-writes.
Type:
Book Chapter
Language:
en
Keywords:
Cognitive Science; Psychology; Hypertext and Hypermedia; User Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDillon, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.editorSharples, Mikeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-14T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:32:03Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-06-14en_US
dc.identifier.citationHow collaborative is collaborative writing? An Analysis of the production of two technical reports 1993, :69-86 Computer Supported Collaborative Writingen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105700-
dc.description.abstractPublished in: M.Sharples (Ed) Computer Supported Collaborative Writing. (London: Springer-Verlag) 1993. pp 69-86. INTRODUCTION: Psychologists have been taking an increasing interest in the writing process over the last decade and models of human cognition and task behaviour during writing are emerging (see e.g., Hayes and Flower 1980, Sharples et al 1989). Though we are far short of a complete model of this process several basic components have been identified and most theorists allude to these at some stage in their description. For example, it is reckoned (as much from common sense as experimental analysis) that most writing proceeds through a basic sequence of actions from a rough plan through a draft to a revision stage which may occur cyclically until the writer believes the document is ready. Plans can be considered as either detailed or vague, influenced by expectations of the readerâ s knowledge, the typical form of the document being produced and so forth. The drafts may vary from the extremely sketchy to the almost complete depending on the writerâ s experience, knowledge of the subject, preferred writing style etc. and revisions include such acts as minor spell checking, proofreading or complete re-writes.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherLondon: Springer-Verlagen_US
dc.subjectCognitive Scienceen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectHypertext and Hypermediaen_US
dc.subjectUser Studiesen_US
dc.titleHow collaborative is collaborative writing? An Analysis of the production of two technical reportsen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.journalComputer Supported Collaborative Writingen_US
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