A New Role for the Concept of Information in the Development of Liberal Arts Curriculum

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105596
Title:
A New Role for the Concept of Information in the Development of Liberal Arts Curriculum
Author:
Schroeder, Marcin Jan
Citation:
A New Role for the Concept of Information in the Development of Liberal Arts Curriculum 2005-01,
Issue Date:
Jan-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105596
Submitted date:
2005-02-02
Abstract:
This is a juried paper (18 pages) presented during Session 1.4 titled LIS Curriculum: Global Perspectives" on Thursday, January 11 at the ALISE 2005 Conference, Boston, Massachusetts (Session Moderator: Bharat Mehra). The Liberal Arts curriculum, understood here as a programmatic standard for the first parts of a university education, rather than a more general philosophy of the entire scope of education, is usually structured through the distinction of different "forms of knowledge," or different "ways of knowing". In this article, the concept of information, in a very broad understanding of this term, is proposed as a factor integrating the Liberal Arts curriculum. The advantages of the diversification of the curriculum achieved by developing in students an awareness of different ways of knowing are lost when such diversification actually produces dissociation of the acquired knowledge. There are several themes which are often effectively used to integrate what students are learning such as intercultural communication, globalization, computer technology, etc. However, the limited universality of even these general themes creates limits for integration. Information however, through its manifestations in almost all domains of the university curriculum, and because of its relation to the concept of knowledge in general, is of special interest as a potential factor in curriculum integration. But before it can be effectively used in educational practice, information must acquire a firm philosophical foundation.
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en
Keywords:
Library and Information Science Education
Local subject classification:
cross-curricular concept and theme; internal organization of curriculum; philosophical aspects of information

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSchroeder, Marcin Janen_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-02-02T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:28:00Z-
dc.date.issued2005-01en_US
dc.date.submitted2005-02-02en_US
dc.identifier.citationA New Role for the Concept of Information in the Development of Liberal Arts Curriculum 2005-01,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105596-
dc.description.abstractThis is a juried paper (18 pages) presented during Session 1.4 titled LIS Curriculum: Global Perspectives" on Thursday, January 11 at the ALISE 2005 Conference, Boston, Massachusetts (Session Moderator: Bharat Mehra). The Liberal Arts curriculum, understood here as a programmatic standard for the first parts of a university education, rather than a more general philosophy of the entire scope of education, is usually structured through the distinction of different "forms of knowledge," or different "ways of knowing". In this article, the concept of information, in a very broad understanding of this term, is proposed as a factor integrating the Liberal Arts curriculum. The advantages of the diversification of the curriculum achieved by developing in students an awareness of different ways of knowing are lost when such diversification actually produces dissociation of the acquired knowledge. There are several themes which are often effectively used to integrate what students are learning such as intercultural communication, globalization, computer technology, etc. However, the limited universality of even these general themes creates limits for integration. Information however, through its manifestations in almost all domains of the university curriculum, and because of its relation to the concept of knowledge in general, is of special interest as a potential factor in curriculum integration. But before it can be effectively used in educational practice, information must acquire a firm philosophical foundation.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectLibrary and Information Science Educationen_US
dc.subject.othercross-curricular concept and themeen_US
dc.subject.otherinternal organization of curriculumen_US
dc.subject.otherphilosophical aspects of informationen_US
dc.titleA New Role for the Concept of Information in the Development of Liberal Arts Curriculumen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
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