Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105582
Title:
Overview of Archives and Archival Issues in Japan
Author:
Koga, Takashi
Citation:
Overview of Archives and Archival Issues in Japan 2007,
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105582
Submitted date:
2009-05-05
Abstract:
Despite the tradition of maintaining official and private archives since around the eight century, the development of modern archives in Japan was hampered until recently. The following posed huge obstacles to the development: (1) poor records management between central and local governments and (2) lack of understanding of archives among the public. The National Archives of Japan (NAJ) was finally established in 1971; national-level legislations concerning the archives were not set until 1987. Now, in the 2000s, there is a strong movement toward the development of archives in Japan. The following are the primary forces behind the movement: (1) development of "digital archives" owing to the popularization of the Internet, especially the Japan Center for Asian Historical Records (JACAR) that was established as a branch of the NAJ in 2001, and (2) political support for archival institutions and archival issues, as shown in the discussion of the advisory panel under the Cabinet Office of Japan since 2003. In addition, the Japan Society for Archival Science (JSAS) was established in 2004 as the first academic society concerning archival science in Japan. The JSAS promotes the establishment of academic foundations of archival science through the acceptance of theories in the Western world, such as the theory of "records continuum." While Japan is experiencing such developments, there are numerous challenges for the future developments of archives in the country, such as raising the number of archival institutions, establishment of legislations concerning archives and records management, and promotion of understanding of archives among the public. Among these challenges, the largest one will be to determine the manner in which an accreditation system for professional archivists can be established and stable employment for prospective archivists can be secured.
Type:
Conference Paper
Language:
en
Keywords:
Archives
Local subject classification:
archives in Japan; history of archives in Japan; public records management in Japan; National Archives of Japan; Japan Center for Asian Historical Records; information policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKoga, Takashien_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-05T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:27:41Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.submitted2009-05-05en_US
dc.identifier.citationOverview of Archives and Archival Issues in Japan 2007,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105582-
dc.description.abstractDespite the tradition of maintaining official and private archives since around the eight century, the development of modern archives in Japan was hampered until recently. The following posed huge obstacles to the development: (1) poor records management between central and local governments and (2) lack of understanding of archives among the public. The National Archives of Japan (NAJ) was finally established in 1971; national-level legislations concerning the archives were not set until 1987. Now, in the 2000s, there is a strong movement toward the development of archives in Japan. The following are the primary forces behind the movement: (1) development of "digital archives" owing to the popularization of the Internet, especially the Japan Center for Asian Historical Records (JACAR) that was established as a branch of the NAJ in 2001, and (2) political support for archival institutions and archival issues, as shown in the discussion of the advisory panel under the Cabinet Office of Japan since 2003. In addition, the Japan Society for Archival Science (JSAS) was established in 2004 as the first academic society concerning archival science in Japan. The JSAS promotes the establishment of academic foundations of archival science through the acceptance of theories in the Western world, such as the theory of "records continuum." While Japan is experiencing such developments, there are numerous challenges for the future developments of archives in the country, such as raising the number of archival institutions, establishment of legislations concerning archives and records management, and promotion of understanding of archives among the public. Among these challenges, the largest one will be to determine the manner in which an accreditation system for professional archivists can be established and stable employment for prospective archivists can be secured.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectArchivesen_US
dc.subject.otherarchives in Japanen_US
dc.subject.otherhistory of archives in Japanen_US
dc.subject.otherpublic records management in Japanen_US
dc.subject.otherNational Archives of Japanen_US
dc.subject.otherJapan Center for Asian Historical Recordsen_US
dc.subject.otherinformation policyen_US
dc.titleOverview of Archives and Archival Issues in Japanen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
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